Body mass index and waist circumference in early adulthood are associated with thoracolumbar spine shape at age 60-64

the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development

Anastasia V Pavlova, Stella G Muthuri, Rachel Cooper, Fiona R Saunders, Jennifer S Gregory, Rebecca Barr, Kathryn R Martin, Judith E. Adams, Diana Kuh, Rebecca J Hardy, Richard M Aspden (Corresponding Author)

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Abstract

This study investigated associations between measures of adiposity from age 36 and spine shape at 60–64 years. Thoracolumbar spine shape was characterised using statistical
shape modelling on lateral dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry images of the spine from 1529 participants of the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, acquired at age 60–
64. Associations of spine shape modes with: 1) contemporaneous measures of total and central adiposity (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC)) and body composition
(android:gynoid fat mass ratio and lean and fat mass indices, calculated as whole body (excluding the head) lean or fat mass (kg) divided by height2 (m)2 ); 2) changes in total and
central adiposity between age 36 and 60–64 and 3) age at onset of overweight, were tested using linear regression models. Four modes described 79% of the total variance in spine
shape. In men, greater lean mass index was associated with a larger lordosis whereas greater fat mass index was associated with straighter spines. Greater current BMI was associated with a more uneven curvature in men and with larger anterior-posterior (a-p) vertebral diameters in both sexes. Greater WC and fat mass index were also associated with ap diameter in both sexes. There was no clear evidence that gains in BMI and WC during earlier stages of adulthood were associated with spine shape but younger onset of overweight was associated with a more uneven spine and greater a-p diameter. In conclusion, sagittal spine shapes had different associations with total and central adiposity; earlier onset of overweight and prior measures of WC were particularly important.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0197570
Number of pages15
JournalPloS ONE
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jun 2018

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national surveys
waist circumference
biomedical research
Waist Circumference
Health Surveys
adulthood
body mass index
Biomedical Research
adiposity
Spine
Body Mass Index
Fats
Health
Adiposity
gender
Linear Models
lipids
Linear regression
body composition
X-radiation

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Body mass index and waist circumference in early adulthood are associated with thoracolumbar spine shape at age 60-64 : the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development. / Pavlova, Anastasia V; Muthuri, Stella G; Cooper, Rachel; Saunders, Fiona R; Gregory, Jennifer S; Barr, Rebecca; Martin, Kathryn R; Adams, Judith E.; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca J; Aspden, Richard M (Corresponding Author).

In: PloS ONE, Vol. 13, No. 6, e0197570, 14.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Body mass index and waist circumference in early adulthood are associated with thoracolumbar spine shape at age 60-64: the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development",
abstract = "This study investigated associations between measures of adiposity from age 36 and spine shape at 60–64 years. Thoracolumbar spine shape was characterised using statisticalshape modelling on lateral dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry images of the spine from 1529 participants of the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, acquired at age 60–64. Associations of spine shape modes with: 1) contemporaneous measures of total and central adiposity (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC)) and body composition(android:gynoid fat mass ratio and lean and fat mass indices, calculated as whole body (excluding the head) lean or fat mass (kg) divided by height2 (m)2 ); 2) changes in total andcentral adiposity between age 36 and 60–64 and 3) age at onset of overweight, were tested using linear regression models. Four modes described 79{\%} of the total variance in spineshape. In men, greater lean mass index was associated with a larger lordosis whereas greater fat mass index was associated with straighter spines. Greater current BMI was associated with a more uneven curvature in men and with larger anterior-posterior (a-p) vertebral diameters in both sexes. Greater WC and fat mass index were also associated with ap diameter in both sexes. There was no clear evidence that gains in BMI and WC during earlier stages of adulthood were associated with spine shape but younger onset of overweight was associated with a more uneven spine and greater a-p diameter. In conclusion, sagittal spine shapes had different associations with total and central adiposity; earlier onset of overweight and prior measures of WC were particularly important.",
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note = "Acknowledgments We thank the NSHD study members for their participation in the study and continual support. Thank you to Dr Michael Machin for assisting with obtaining the images and the University of Aberdeen Data Management Team for programming support for ‘Shape’ software. The authors are grateful to the NSHD scientific and data collection teams at the following centres: MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing; Wellcome Trust (WT) Clinical Research Facility (CRF) Manchester; WTCRF and Medical Physics at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh; WTCRF and Department of Nuclear Medicine at University Hospital Birmingham; WTCRF and the Department of Nuclear Medicine at University College London Hospital; CRF and the Department of Medical Physics at the University Hospital of Wales; CRF and Twin Research Unit at St Thomas’ Hospital London. We wish to acknowledge the crucial role of Professor Judith E Adams (deceased 30 September 2017) in undertaking this project.",
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N1 - Acknowledgments We thank the NSHD study members for their participation in the study and continual support. Thank you to Dr Michael Machin for assisting with obtaining the images and the University of Aberdeen Data Management Team for programming support for ‘Shape’ software. The authors are grateful to the NSHD scientific and data collection teams at the following centres: MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing; Wellcome Trust (WT) Clinical Research Facility (CRF) Manchester; WTCRF and Medical Physics at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh; WTCRF and Department of Nuclear Medicine at University Hospital Birmingham; WTCRF and the Department of Nuclear Medicine at University College London Hospital; CRF and the Department of Medical Physics at the University Hospital of Wales; CRF and Twin Research Unit at St Thomas’ Hospital London. We wish to acknowledge the crucial role of Professor Judith E Adams (deceased 30 September 2017) in undertaking this project.

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N2 - This study investigated associations between measures of adiposity from age 36 and spine shape at 60–64 years. Thoracolumbar spine shape was characterised using statisticalshape modelling on lateral dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry images of the spine from 1529 participants of the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, acquired at age 60–64. Associations of spine shape modes with: 1) contemporaneous measures of total and central adiposity (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC)) and body composition(android:gynoid fat mass ratio and lean and fat mass indices, calculated as whole body (excluding the head) lean or fat mass (kg) divided by height2 (m)2 ); 2) changes in total andcentral adiposity between age 36 and 60–64 and 3) age at onset of overweight, were tested using linear regression models. Four modes described 79% of the total variance in spineshape. In men, greater lean mass index was associated with a larger lordosis whereas greater fat mass index was associated with straighter spines. Greater current BMI was associated with a more uneven curvature in men and with larger anterior-posterior (a-p) vertebral diameters in both sexes. Greater WC and fat mass index were also associated with ap diameter in both sexes. There was no clear evidence that gains in BMI and WC during earlier stages of adulthood were associated with spine shape but younger onset of overweight was associated with a more uneven spine and greater a-p diameter. In conclusion, sagittal spine shapes had different associations with total and central adiposity; earlier onset of overweight and prior measures of WC were particularly important.

AB - This study investigated associations between measures of adiposity from age 36 and spine shape at 60–64 years. Thoracolumbar spine shape was characterised using statisticalshape modelling on lateral dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry images of the spine from 1529 participants of the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, acquired at age 60–64. Associations of spine shape modes with: 1) contemporaneous measures of total and central adiposity (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC)) and body composition(android:gynoid fat mass ratio and lean and fat mass indices, calculated as whole body (excluding the head) lean or fat mass (kg) divided by height2 (m)2 ); 2) changes in total andcentral adiposity between age 36 and 60–64 and 3) age at onset of overweight, were tested using linear regression models. Four modes described 79% of the total variance in spineshape. In men, greater lean mass index was associated with a larger lordosis whereas greater fat mass index was associated with straighter spines. Greater current BMI was associated with a more uneven curvature in men and with larger anterior-posterior (a-p) vertebral diameters in both sexes. Greater WC and fat mass index were also associated with ap diameter in both sexes. There was no clear evidence that gains in BMI and WC during earlier stages of adulthood were associated with spine shape but younger onset of overweight was associated with a more uneven spine and greater a-p diameter. In conclusion, sagittal spine shapes had different associations with total and central adiposity; earlier onset of overweight and prior measures of WC were particularly important.

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