Bogged down in history

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The article explains how tin was exploited became clear when Andy Meharg and colleagues Kevin Edwards and Ed Schofield got stuck into two West Country peat bogs. These bogs have been soaking up atmospheric pollution for centuries and they hoped that pollution would include traces of tin released into the atmosphere from mining and tin working. The cores showed that, at most, there was only sporadic atmospheric deposition of tin into the peat during the Bronze Age, between around 2500 and 800BC, and this pattern continued until early Roman colonization, around AD100. Findings imply that tin mining and trading was highly organized in early medieval Britain and, together with finds like Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire gold hoard discovered in 2009, this suggests that 'Dark Age' society was technologically richer and more organized than many people assume.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-25
Number of pages2
JournalPlanet Earth
Issue numberSummer
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012

Fingerprint

tin
history
Bronze Age
Medieval
bog
atmospheric deposition
peatland
peat
atmospheric pollution
colonization
gold
pollution
atmosphere

Keywords

  • anthropology
  • archaeology
  • natural resources

Cite this

Bogged down in history. / Meharg, A.; Edwards, Kevin J.; Schofield, J.E.

In: Planet Earth, No. Summer, 01.01.2012, p. 24-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meharg, A, Edwards, KJ & Schofield, JE 2012, 'Bogged down in history' Planet Earth, no. Summer, pp. 24-25.
Meharg A, Edwards KJ, Schofield JE. Bogged down in history. Planet Earth. 2012 Jan 1;(Summer):24-25.
Meharg, A. ; Edwards, Kevin J. ; Schofield, J.E. / Bogged down in history. In: Planet Earth. 2012 ; No. Summer. pp. 24-25.
@article{dbdaf3fab36747e7ad8b93e16c008475,
title = "Bogged down in history",
abstract = "The article explains how tin was exploited became clear when Andy Meharg and colleagues Kevin Edwards and Ed Schofield got stuck into two West Country peat bogs. These bogs have been soaking up atmospheric pollution for centuries and they hoped that pollution would include traces of tin released into the atmosphere from mining and tin working. The cores showed that, at most, there was only sporadic atmospheric deposition of tin into the peat during the Bronze Age, between around 2500 and 800BC, and this pattern continued until early Roman colonization, around AD100. Findings imply that tin mining and trading was highly organized in early medieval Britain and, together with finds like Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire gold hoard discovered in 2009, this suggests that 'Dark Age' society was technologically richer and more organized than many people assume.",
keywords = "anthropology, archaeology, natural resources",
author = "A. Meharg and Edwards, {Kevin J.} and J.E. Schofield",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
pages = "24--25",
journal = "Planet Earth",
issn = "1479-2605",
publisher = "Natural Environment Research Council",
number = "Summer",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bogged down in history

AU - Meharg, A.

AU - Edwards, Kevin J.

AU - Schofield, J.E.

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - The article explains how tin was exploited became clear when Andy Meharg and colleagues Kevin Edwards and Ed Schofield got stuck into two West Country peat bogs. These bogs have been soaking up atmospheric pollution for centuries and they hoped that pollution would include traces of tin released into the atmosphere from mining and tin working. The cores showed that, at most, there was only sporadic atmospheric deposition of tin into the peat during the Bronze Age, between around 2500 and 800BC, and this pattern continued until early Roman colonization, around AD100. Findings imply that tin mining and trading was highly organized in early medieval Britain and, together with finds like Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire gold hoard discovered in 2009, this suggests that 'Dark Age' society was technologically richer and more organized than many people assume.

AB - The article explains how tin was exploited became clear when Andy Meharg and colleagues Kevin Edwards and Ed Schofield got stuck into two West Country peat bogs. These bogs have been soaking up atmospheric pollution for centuries and they hoped that pollution would include traces of tin released into the atmosphere from mining and tin working. The cores showed that, at most, there was only sporadic atmospheric deposition of tin into the peat during the Bronze Age, between around 2500 and 800BC, and this pattern continued until early Roman colonization, around AD100. Findings imply that tin mining and trading was highly organized in early medieval Britain and, together with finds like Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire gold hoard discovered in 2009, this suggests that 'Dark Age' society was technologically richer and more organized than many people assume.

KW - anthropology

KW - archaeology

KW - natural resources

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862747293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

SP - 24

EP - 25

JO - Planet Earth

JF - Planet Earth

SN - 1479-2605

IS - Summer

ER -