Border Bloodshed: Scotland and England at War 1369-1403

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Scottish military offensives against England from 1369 were largely the product of government policy, and involved the participation of much of the political community of the realm. They were launched with careful timing, taking into account of international developments and domestic problems in England. In the reign of Robert II they involved close co-operation with France and succeeded militarily, enabling the Scots regain English-occupied lands in southern Scotland and achieve diplomatic gains. Military success encouraged the Scots to the point where they were willing to engae in attacks on England beyond the ambition of their French allies. However, diplomatic gains fell short of forcing English recognition of Scottish independence. Hopes of achieveing this by military means were ended in the reign of Robert III when the Scots were heavily defeated in 1402. There is no sign that the impact of war in these years led to the development of a distinctive set of attitudes and mode of social behaviour among the Scottish borderers. In contract to the English borders, where such features can be discerned throughout the 14th century, fugitive national loyalties, excess criminality and their possible causes cannot readily be discerned until the early 15th century. War was not fought with only political objectives in mind or other "rational" factors such as the quest for financial gain. The Scots went to war, and their leaders organized it, for emotive reasons also, such as hatred of the English, the search for renown, and the sheer enjoyment of fighting. All these factors inspired the Scots to launch a series of bloody, brutal and ultimately futile offensives against England. This book offers an international study of Scotland, England and France and examines men's motives for going to war.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationEast Linton, United Kingdom
PublisherTuckwell Press
Number of pages277
ISBN (Print)186232106X, 978-1862321069
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2000

Fingerprint

England
Scotland
Military
Reign
France
Participation
Government Policy
International Development
Loyalty
Excess
Hatred
Causes
Enjoyment
Renown
Ambition
Launch
Attack
Political Community
Allies
Criminality

Cite this

MacDonald, A. J. (2000). Border Bloodshed: Scotland and England at War 1369-1403. East Linton, United Kingdom: Tuckwell Press.

Border Bloodshed : Scotland and England at War 1369-1403. / MacDonald, Alastair John.

East Linton, United Kingdom : Tuckwell Press, 2000. 277 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

MacDonald, AJ 2000, Border Bloodshed: Scotland and England at War 1369-1403. Tuckwell Press, East Linton, United Kingdom.
MacDonald AJ. Border Bloodshed: Scotland and England at War 1369-1403. East Linton, United Kingdom: Tuckwell Press, 2000. 277 p.
MacDonald, Alastair John. / Border Bloodshed : Scotland and England at War 1369-1403. East Linton, United Kingdom : Tuckwell Press, 2000. 277 p.
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