Brain white matter lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging are associated with balance and gait speed

J. M. Starr, S. A. Leaper, Alison Dorothy Murray, H.a. Lemmon, Roger T Staff, I. J. Deary, Lawrence Jeffrey Whalley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

155 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the relations between premorbid and current mental ability, mood, and white matter signal abnormalities detected by T2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and impairment of balance and mobility in older adults.
Methods: 97 subjects from the Aberdeen 1921 birth cohort underwent brain MRI, evaluation of balance, and measurement of gait speed. White matter hyperintensities detected on T2 weighted MRI scans were rated by three independent raters on three variables: white matter lesions; periventricular lesions; and brain stem lesions.
Results: Decreased gait speed was correlated with impaired visual acuity (p = 0.020), shorter stature (p = 0.008), a lower childhood IQ (p = 0.030), a lower current Raven's progressive matrices score (Raven score) (p < 0.001), a higher hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) score (p = 0.004), and an increased grade of brain stem lesions on MRI. Inability to balance was correlated with Raven score (p = 0.042), brain stem lesions (p = 0.003), white matter lesions (p = 0.003), and periventricular lesions (p = 0.038). Binary logistic regression identified brain stem lesions (odds ratio (OR) 0.22; 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.54) and HADS depression score (OR 0.75; 0.58 to 0.97) as the only significant associations with balance. Structural equation modelling detected an association between two latent traits representing white matter disease and an integrating function, respectively.
Conclusions: In this cohort, white matter lesions, periventricular lesions, and brain stem lesions were associated with impaired balance. Current mental ability was strongly related to gait speed. There appears to be a concordance between motor skills and intellect in old age, which is degraded by white matter disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-98
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003

Keywords

  • cardiovascular health
  • risk factors
  • elderly people
  • older persons
  • cognitive function
  • injurious falls
  • blood pressure
  • age
  • hypertensities
  • leukoaraiosis

Cite this

Brain white matter lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging are associated with balance and gait speed. / Starr, J. M.; Leaper, S. A.; Murray, Alison Dorothy; Lemmon, H.a.; Staff, Roger T; Deary, I. J.; Whalley, Lawrence Jeffrey.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, Vol. 74, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 94-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To investigate the relations between premorbid and current mental ability, mood, and white matter signal abnormalities detected by T2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and impairment of balance and mobility in older adults. Methods: 97 subjects from the Aberdeen 1921 birth cohort underwent brain MRI, evaluation of balance, and measurement of gait speed. White matter hyperintensities detected on T2 weighted MRI scans were rated by three independent raters on three variables: white matter lesions; periventricular lesions; and brain stem lesions. Results: Decreased gait speed was correlated with impaired visual acuity (p = 0.020), shorter stature (p = 0.008), a lower childhood IQ (p = 0.030), a lower current Raven's progressive matrices score (Raven score) (p < 0.001), a higher hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) score (p = 0.004), and an increased grade of brain stem lesions on MRI. Inability to balance was correlated with Raven score (p = 0.042), brain stem lesions (p = 0.003), white matter lesions (p = 0.003), and periventricular lesions (p = 0.038). Binary logistic regression identified brain stem lesions (odds ratio (OR) 0.22; 95{\%} confidence interval 0.09 to 0.54) and HADS depression score (OR 0.75; 0.58 to 0.97) as the only significant associations with balance. Structural equation modelling detected an association between two latent traits representing white matter disease and an integrating function, respectively. Conclusions: In this cohort, white matter lesions, periventricular lesions, and brain stem lesions were associated with impaired balance. Current mental ability was strongly related to gait speed. There appears to be a concordance between motor skills and intellect in old age, which is degraded by white matter disease.",
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T1 - Brain white matter lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging are associated with balance and gait speed

AU - Starr, J. M.

AU - Leaper, S. A.

AU - Murray, Alison Dorothy

AU - Lemmon, H.a.

AU - Staff, Roger T

AU - Deary, I. J.

AU - Whalley, Lawrence Jeffrey

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N2 - Objective: To investigate the relations between premorbid and current mental ability, mood, and white matter signal abnormalities detected by T2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and impairment of balance and mobility in older adults. Methods: 97 subjects from the Aberdeen 1921 birth cohort underwent brain MRI, evaluation of balance, and measurement of gait speed. White matter hyperintensities detected on T2 weighted MRI scans were rated by three independent raters on three variables: white matter lesions; periventricular lesions; and brain stem lesions. Results: Decreased gait speed was correlated with impaired visual acuity (p = 0.020), shorter stature (p = 0.008), a lower childhood IQ (p = 0.030), a lower current Raven's progressive matrices score (Raven score) (p < 0.001), a higher hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) score (p = 0.004), and an increased grade of brain stem lesions on MRI. Inability to balance was correlated with Raven score (p = 0.042), brain stem lesions (p = 0.003), white matter lesions (p = 0.003), and periventricular lesions (p = 0.038). Binary logistic regression identified brain stem lesions (odds ratio (OR) 0.22; 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.54) and HADS depression score (OR 0.75; 0.58 to 0.97) as the only significant associations with balance. Structural equation modelling detected an association between two latent traits representing white matter disease and an integrating function, respectively. Conclusions: In this cohort, white matter lesions, periventricular lesions, and brain stem lesions were associated with impaired balance. Current mental ability was strongly related to gait speed. There appears to be a concordance between motor skills and intellect in old age, which is degraded by white matter disease.

AB - Objective: To investigate the relations between premorbid and current mental ability, mood, and white matter signal abnormalities detected by T2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and impairment of balance and mobility in older adults. Methods: 97 subjects from the Aberdeen 1921 birth cohort underwent brain MRI, evaluation of balance, and measurement of gait speed. White matter hyperintensities detected on T2 weighted MRI scans were rated by three independent raters on three variables: white matter lesions; periventricular lesions; and brain stem lesions. Results: Decreased gait speed was correlated with impaired visual acuity (p = 0.020), shorter stature (p = 0.008), a lower childhood IQ (p = 0.030), a lower current Raven's progressive matrices score (Raven score) (p < 0.001), a higher hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) score (p = 0.004), and an increased grade of brain stem lesions on MRI. Inability to balance was correlated with Raven score (p = 0.042), brain stem lesions (p = 0.003), white matter lesions (p = 0.003), and periventricular lesions (p = 0.038). Binary logistic regression identified brain stem lesions (odds ratio (OR) 0.22; 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.54) and HADS depression score (OR 0.75; 0.58 to 0.97) as the only significant associations with balance. Structural equation modelling detected an association between two latent traits representing white matter disease and an integrating function, respectively. Conclusions: In this cohort, white matter lesions, periventricular lesions, and brain stem lesions were associated with impaired balance. Current mental ability was strongly related to gait speed. There appears to be a concordance between motor skills and intellect in old age, which is degraded by white matter disease.

KW - cardiovascular health

KW - risk factors

KW - elderly people

KW - older persons

KW - cognitive function

KW - injurious falls

KW - blood pressure

KW - age

KW - hypertensities

KW - leukoaraiosis

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JO - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry

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