Breakthrough adsorption study of a commercial activated carbon for pre-combustion CO2 capture

S Garcia, M V Gil, C F Martin, J J Pis, F Rubiera, C Pevida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In this study a commercial activated carbon (Norit R2030CO2) was assessed as a solid sorbent for precombustion CO2 capture. This technology involves the removal of CO2 from the shifted-syngas prior to the generation of electricity and the production of high-purity clean H2. The CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity and breakthrough time were evaluated in a flow-through system where the adsorbent was subjected to four consecutive adsorption–desorption cycles. A CO2/H2/N2 gas mixture (20/70/10 vol.% at normal conditions) was employed as the influent gas stream. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to assess the combined effect of the adsorption CO2 partial pressure and temperature (independent variables) on CO2 capture capacity and breakthrough time (response variables) for the activated carbon. The CO2 partial pressure ranged from 1 to 3 bar within a total pressure range of 5–15 bar and a temperature range of 25–65 °C. No interaction effect between the two independent variables on the responses was found. The CO2 partial pressure was observed to be the most influential variable, with high values leading to an increase in both the CO2 capture capacity and the breakthrough time. However, an increase in the temperature led to a decrease in both response variables. The maximum values of the response variables within the experimental region studied were obtained at 25 °C and under a CO2 partial pressure of 3 bar (15 bar total pressure).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)549-556
Number of pages8
JournalChemical Engineering Journal
Volume171
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2011

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partial pressure
Partial pressure
Activated carbon
activated carbon
combustion
adsorption
Adsorption
Precombustion
Charcoal
temperature
Sorbents
Gas mixtures
Temperature
Adsorbents
electricity
Electricity
Gases
gas
effect

Keywords

  • response surface methodology
  • pre-combustion
  • activated carbon
  • CO2 capture
  • breakthrough time

Cite this

Breakthrough adsorption study of a commercial activated carbon for pre-combustion CO2 capture. / Garcia, S; Gil, M V; Martin, C F; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F; Pevida, C.

In: Chemical Engineering Journal, Vol. 171, No. 2, 01.07.2011, p. 549-556.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garcia, S ; Gil, M V ; Martin, C F ; Pis, J J ; Rubiera, F ; Pevida, C. / Breakthrough adsorption study of a commercial activated carbon for pre-combustion CO2 capture. In: Chemical Engineering Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 171, No. 2. pp. 549-556.
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