Breastfeeding practice and its association with respiratory symptoms and atopic disease in 1-3-year-old children in the city of Riyadh, central Saudi Arabia

Amel Al-Makoshi, Abdulrahman Al-Frayh, Stephen Turner, Graham Devereux

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Saudi Arabia has a declining rate of breastfeeding and increasing levels of childhood asthma and atopic disease. In highly economically developed countries, breastfeeding of children at high risk of atopic disease reduces the likelihood of atopic dermatitis, wheezing associated with respiratory infections, and possibly asthma. This study investigated the prevalence of breastfeeding and its association with wheezing/asthma and atopic disease in 1-3-year-old children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study of children attending routine "well-baby" clinics in three Saudi State Hospitals in Riyadh. An interviewer administered a questionnaire to collect data on sociodemographics, breastfeeding, wheezing symptoms, asthma, and atopic disease.

RESULTS: In total, 622 children 1-3 years old were recruited. Of these, 75% of children were ever breastfed, and 36% of children were fully breastfed, with 20% of children being fully breastfed for ≥ 3 months. Increasing duration of full breastfeeding was associated with a reduced likelihood of maternal reporting of her child having "ever wheezed," "wheezed' in the last 12 months," and "ever having asthma," with adjusted odds ratio for full breastfeeding ≥ 12 months versus never breastfed of 0.51 (95% confidence interval 0.29-0.90), 0.48 (0.26-0.88), and 0.46 (0.22-0.94), respectively. No associations were demonstrable between full or ever breastfeeding and atopic dermatitis/eczema, irrespective of family history of atopic disease.

CONCLUSIONS: Although breastfeeding does not protect children from developing eczema in Riyadh, full breastfeeding is associated with reduced childhood wheezing and possibly asthma. Further efforts should be made to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalBreastfeeding Medicine: the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
Volume8
Issue number1
Early online date5 Oct 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013

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Urbanization
Saudi Arabia
Breast Feeding
Asthma
Respiratory Sounds
Atopic Dermatitis
Cross-Sectional Studies
State Hospitals
Eczema
Developed Countries
Respiratory Tract Infections
Odds Ratio
Mothers
Confidence Intervals
Interviews

Cite this

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title = "Breastfeeding practice and its association with respiratory symptoms and atopic disease in 1-3-year-old children in the city of Riyadh, central Saudi Arabia",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Saudi Arabia has a declining rate of breastfeeding and increasing levels of childhood asthma and atopic disease. In highly economically developed countries, breastfeeding of children at high risk of atopic disease reduces the likelihood of atopic dermatitis, wheezing associated with respiratory infections, and possibly asthma. This study investigated the prevalence of breastfeeding and its association with wheezing/asthma and atopic disease in 1-3-year-old children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study of children attending routine {"}well-baby{"} clinics in three Saudi State Hospitals in Riyadh. An interviewer administered a questionnaire to collect data on sociodemographics, breastfeeding, wheezing symptoms, asthma, and atopic disease.RESULTS: In total, 622 children 1-3 years old were recruited. Of these, 75{\%} of children were ever breastfed, and 36{\%} of children were fully breastfed, with 20{\%} of children being fully breastfed for ≥ 3 months. Increasing duration of full breastfeeding was associated with a reduced likelihood of maternal reporting of her child having {"}ever wheezed,{"} {"}wheezed' in the last 12 months,{"} and {"}ever having asthma,{"} with adjusted odds ratio for full breastfeeding ≥ 12 months versus never breastfed of 0.51 (95{\%} confidence interval 0.29-0.90), 0.48 (0.26-0.88), and 0.46 (0.22-0.94), respectively. No associations were demonstrable between full or ever breastfeeding and atopic dermatitis/eczema, irrespective of family history of atopic disease.CONCLUSIONS: Although breastfeeding does not protect children from developing eczema in Riyadh, full breastfeeding is associated with reduced childhood wheezing and possibly asthma. Further efforts should be made to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia.",
author = "Amel Al-Makoshi and Abdulrahman Al-Frayh and Stephen Turner and Graham Devereux",
year = "2013",
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doi = "10.1089/bfm.2011.0137",
language = "English",
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journal = "Breastfeeding Medicine: the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Breastfeeding practice and its association with respiratory symptoms and atopic disease in 1-3-year-old children in the city of Riyadh, central Saudi Arabia

AU - Al-Makoshi, Amel

AU - Al-Frayh, Abdulrahman

AU - Turner, Stephen

AU - Devereux, Graham

PY - 2013/2/1

Y1 - 2013/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Saudi Arabia has a declining rate of breastfeeding and increasing levels of childhood asthma and atopic disease. In highly economically developed countries, breastfeeding of children at high risk of atopic disease reduces the likelihood of atopic dermatitis, wheezing associated with respiratory infections, and possibly asthma. This study investigated the prevalence of breastfeeding and its association with wheezing/asthma and atopic disease in 1-3-year-old children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study of children attending routine "well-baby" clinics in three Saudi State Hospitals in Riyadh. An interviewer administered a questionnaire to collect data on sociodemographics, breastfeeding, wheezing symptoms, asthma, and atopic disease.RESULTS: In total, 622 children 1-3 years old were recruited. Of these, 75% of children were ever breastfed, and 36% of children were fully breastfed, with 20% of children being fully breastfed for ≥ 3 months. Increasing duration of full breastfeeding was associated with a reduced likelihood of maternal reporting of her child having "ever wheezed," "wheezed' in the last 12 months," and "ever having asthma," with adjusted odds ratio for full breastfeeding ≥ 12 months versus never breastfed of 0.51 (95% confidence interval 0.29-0.90), 0.48 (0.26-0.88), and 0.46 (0.22-0.94), respectively. No associations were demonstrable between full or ever breastfeeding and atopic dermatitis/eczema, irrespective of family history of atopic disease.CONCLUSIONS: Although breastfeeding does not protect children from developing eczema in Riyadh, full breastfeeding is associated with reduced childhood wheezing and possibly asthma. Further efforts should be made to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia.

AB - BACKGROUND: Saudi Arabia has a declining rate of breastfeeding and increasing levels of childhood asthma and atopic disease. In highly economically developed countries, breastfeeding of children at high risk of atopic disease reduces the likelihood of atopic dermatitis, wheezing associated with respiratory infections, and possibly asthma. This study investigated the prevalence of breastfeeding and its association with wheezing/asthma and atopic disease in 1-3-year-old children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study of children attending routine "well-baby" clinics in three Saudi State Hospitals in Riyadh. An interviewer administered a questionnaire to collect data on sociodemographics, breastfeeding, wheezing symptoms, asthma, and atopic disease.RESULTS: In total, 622 children 1-3 years old were recruited. Of these, 75% of children were ever breastfed, and 36% of children were fully breastfed, with 20% of children being fully breastfed for ≥ 3 months. Increasing duration of full breastfeeding was associated with a reduced likelihood of maternal reporting of her child having "ever wheezed," "wheezed' in the last 12 months," and "ever having asthma," with adjusted odds ratio for full breastfeeding ≥ 12 months versus never breastfed of 0.51 (95% confidence interval 0.29-0.90), 0.48 (0.26-0.88), and 0.46 (0.22-0.94), respectively. No associations were demonstrable between full or ever breastfeeding and atopic dermatitis/eczema, irrespective of family history of atopic disease.CONCLUSIONS: Although breastfeeding does not protect children from developing eczema in Riyadh, full breastfeeding is associated with reduced childhood wheezing and possibly asthma. Further efforts should be made to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia.

U2 - 10.1089/bfm.2011.0137

DO - 10.1089/bfm.2011.0137

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 127

EP - 133

JO - Breastfeeding Medicine: the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

JF - Breastfeeding Medicine: the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

SN - 1556-8253

IS - 1

ER -