Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe

Matti J. Koivula*, Dan E. Chamberlain, Robert J. Fuller, Stephen C.F. Palmer, Attila Bankovics, Fintan Bracken, Tom Bolger, Eduardo de Juana, Marc Montadert, Renato Neves, Rui Rufino, Angel Sallent, Luís Lopes da Silva, Pedro J. Leitão, Manfred Steffen, Allan D. Watt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Loss, fragmentation and decreasing quality of habitats have been proposed as major threats to biodiversity world-wide, but relatively little is known about biodiversity responses to multiple pressures, particularly at very large spatial scales. We evaluated the relative contributions of four landscape variables (habitat cover, diversity, fragmentation and productivity) in determining different components of avian diversity across Europe. We sampled breeding birds in multiple 1-km2 landscapes, from high forest cover to intensive agricultural land, in eight countries during 2001-2002. We predicted that the total diversity would peak at intermediate levels of forest cover and fragmentation, and respond positively to increasing habitat diversity and productivity; forest and open-habitat specialists would show threshold conditions along gradients of forest cover and fragmentation, and respond positively to increasing habitat diversity and productivity; resident species would be more strongly impacted by forest cover and fragmentation than migratory species; and generalists and urban species would show weak responses. Measures of total diversity did not peak at intermediate levels of forest cover or fragmentation. Rarefaction-standardized species richness decreased marginally and linearly with increasing forest cover and increased non-linearly with productivity, whereas all measures increased linearly with increasing fragmentation and landscape diversity. Forest and open-habitat specialists responded approximately linearly to forest cover and also weakly to habitat diversity, fragmentation and productivity. Generalists and urban species responded weakly to the landscape variables, but some groups responded non-linearly to productivity and marginally to habitat diversity. Resident species were not consistently more sensitive than migratory species to any of the landscape variables. These findings are relevant to landscapes with relatively long histories of human land-use, and they highlight that habitat loss, fragmentation and habitat-type diversity must all be considered in land-use planning and landscape modeling of avian communities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1331-1344
Number of pages13
JournalEcography
Volume41
Issue number8
Early online date26 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Aug 2018

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species diversity
fragmentation
forest cover
land use
agriculture
birds
breeding
habitats
habitat
productivity
migratory species
generalist
biodiversity
bird species
Europe
breeding bird
land use planning
habitat loss
habitat destruction
habitat type

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Koivula, M. J., Chamberlain, D. E., Fuller, R. J., Palmer, S. C. F., Bankovics, A., Bracken, F., ... Watt, A. D. (2018). Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe. Ecography, 41(8), 1331-1344. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecog.03295

Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe. / Koivula, Matti J.; Chamberlain, Dan E.; Fuller, Robert J.; Palmer, Stephen C.F.; Bankovics, Attila; Bracken, Fintan; Bolger, Tom; de Juana, Eduardo; Montadert, Marc; Neves, Renato; Rufino, Rui; Sallent, Angel; da Silva, Luís Lopes; Leitão, Pedro J.; Steffen, Manfred; Watt, Allan D.

In: Ecography, Vol. 41, No. 8, 31.08.2018, p. 1331-1344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koivula, MJ, Chamberlain, DE, Fuller, RJ, Palmer, SCF, Bankovics, A, Bracken, F, Bolger, T, de Juana, E, Montadert, M, Neves, R, Rufino, R, Sallent, A, da Silva, LL, Leitão, PJ, Steffen, M & Watt, AD 2018, 'Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe', Ecography, vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 1331-1344. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecog.03295
Koivula MJ, Chamberlain DE, Fuller RJ, Palmer SCF, Bankovics A, Bracken F et al. Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe. Ecography. 2018 Aug 31;41(8):1331-1344. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecog.03295
Koivula, Matti J. ; Chamberlain, Dan E. ; Fuller, Robert J. ; Palmer, Stephen C.F. ; Bankovics, Attila ; Bracken, Fintan ; Bolger, Tom ; de Juana, Eduardo ; Montadert, Marc ; Neves, Renato ; Rufino, Rui ; Sallent, Angel ; da Silva, Luís Lopes ; Leitão, Pedro J. ; Steffen, Manfred ; Watt, Allan D. / Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe. In: Ecography. 2018 ; Vol. 41, No. 8. pp. 1331-1344.
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abstract = "Loss, fragmentation and decreasing quality of habitats have been proposed as major threats to biodiversity world-wide, but relatively little is known about biodiversity responses to multiple pressures, particularly at very large spatial scales. We evaluated the relative contributions of four landscape variables (habitat cover, diversity, fragmentation and productivity) in determining different components of avian diversity across Europe. We sampled breeding birds in multiple 1-km2 landscapes, from high forest cover to intensive agricultural land, in eight countries during 2001-2002. We predicted that the total diversity would peak at intermediate levels of forest cover and fragmentation, and respond positively to increasing habitat diversity and productivity; forest and open-habitat specialists would show threshold conditions along gradients of forest cover and fragmentation, and respond positively to increasing habitat diversity and productivity; resident species would be more strongly impacted by forest cover and fragmentation than migratory species; and generalists and urban species would show weak responses. Measures of total diversity did not peak at intermediate levels of forest cover or fragmentation. Rarefaction-standardized species richness decreased marginally and linearly with increasing forest cover and increased non-linearly with productivity, whereas all measures increased linearly with increasing fragmentation and landscape diversity. Forest and open-habitat specialists responded approximately linearly to forest cover and also weakly to habitat diversity, fragmentation and productivity. Generalists and urban species responded weakly to the landscape variables, but some groups responded non-linearly to productivity and marginally to habitat diversity. Resident species were not consistently more sensitive than migratory species to any of the landscape variables. These findings are relevant to landscapes with relatively long histories of human land-use, and they highlight that habitat loss, fragmentation and habitat-type diversity must all be considered in land-use planning and landscape modeling of avian communities.",
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