Bridging conceptual divides related to sex, gender and sexuality in teacher education

Jose Adan Cardona Lopez, Mervi Heikkinen, Education in the North

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    A fluid understanding of sex, gender and sexuality contradicts categorical binary thinking. In this article on the implementation of the ethical principles of ‘shared moral space’ (Nussbaum 2008) and ‘deconstructive ethics’ (Lenz-Taguchi 2007), we illustrate the realization of these two principles within a framework of gender and sexual diversity on a professional ethics course. Deconstructive ethics is integrated into our course with teacher education students, querying assumptions on sex, gender and sexuality.
    Sex, gender and sexuality are explored as part of the course in order to deconstruct gender- stereotyped meaning-making and provide a safe space to learn about LGBTIQQAA2S – as we refer to gender and sexual diversity issues in initial teacher education. The fluidity of these categories becomes apparent in cases that break the boundaries of the normative categories, e.g. transgender and intersex children and young people. Therefore, the approach in question is about reconstructing a fluid understanding of sex, gender, and sexuality.
    Teacher education students’ learning process on the topic is supported by a pedagogical approach that is grounded in critical self-reflection, with theory and practice aiming to produce critical self-empowerment when realizing the various dimensions of the ethical responsibility of the teaching profession.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)24-48
    Number of pages26
    JournalEducation in the North
    Volume22
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015

    Keywords

    • gender-complex pedagogy
    • gender
    • ethics
    • sex
    • sexuality
    • teacher
    • education

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