Bringing Animals to the Motorhome: Cree Hunters’ Knowledge of and Communications with Moose

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Since beginning ethnographic research in northern Alberta in 1996, I have discussed, participated in, and observed many aspects of moose hunting (including planning the hunt) and moose processing (including cooking and distributing food) among Cree households, and have interviewed elders and bush people about moose hunting, trapping, and life on the land. Through fieldwork since 2012, I have particularly set out to document knowledge of and communications with moose to examine aspects of these relationships in ethnographic and sociolinguistic terms. Especially through my work with Mike Beaver, I have learned much about the social, ecological, and ritual knowledge embedded in terminology about moose age and sex categories or body parts, and about the ontological and experiential knowledge embedded in Cree approaches to talking to and about animals. Presenting this new data on lexicons of knowledge, bodies of communicative practice, and instances of ritualized respect is the focus of the paper.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 13 May 2015
EventCanadian Anthropological Society (CASCA). Landscapes of knowledges - , Canada
Duration: 13 May 201514 May 2015

Conference

ConferenceCanadian Anthropological Society (CASCA). Landscapes of knowledges
CountryCanada
Period13/05/1514/05/15

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communications
animal
experiential knowledge
sociolinguistics
technical language
religious behavior
respect
food
planning

Cite this

Westman, C. (2015). Bringing Animals to the Motorhome: Cree Hunters’ Knowledge of and Communications with Moose. Paper presented at Canadian Anthropological Society (CASCA). Landscapes of knowledges, Canada.

Bringing Animals to the Motorhome : Cree Hunters’ Knowledge of and Communications with Moose. / Westman, Clinton.

2015. Paper presented at Canadian Anthropological Society (CASCA). Landscapes of knowledges, Canada.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Westman, C 2015, 'Bringing Animals to the Motorhome: Cree Hunters’ Knowledge of and Communications with Moose' Paper presented at Canadian Anthropological Society (CASCA). Landscapes of knowledges, Canada, 13/05/15 - 14/05/15, .
Westman C. Bringing Animals to the Motorhome: Cree Hunters’ Knowledge of and Communications with Moose. 2015. Paper presented at Canadian Anthropological Society (CASCA). Landscapes of knowledges, Canada.
Westman, Clinton. / Bringing Animals to the Motorhome : Cree Hunters’ Knowledge of and Communications with Moose. Paper presented at Canadian Anthropological Society (CASCA). Landscapes of knowledges, Canada.
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