Building Log Cabins in Teetl'it Gwich'in Country

Vernacular Architecture, Local History, and Continuities

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Log Cabins continue to be an important architectural form in Teetlit Gwich‘in country (Peel River, Northwest Territories) for many reasons. This paper will discuss how a local history of cross-cultural encounters in Gwich‘in country informs the practice and significance of building these cabins. In Gwich‘in discourse, these cabins emerge as constellations of personal and group stories indexing a period of positive cultural exchange between Gwich‘in and Scottish fur traders during the nineteenth century. Furthermore, in building these practical architectural forms, Gwich‘in also maintain claims to their country, to local understandings of their history, continuity of tradition on the land, and establish a relative permanence of home.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009
EventChacmool conference - Calgary, Canada
Duration: 13 Nov 200916 Nov 2009

Conference

ConferenceChacmool conference
CountryCanada
CityCalgary
Period13/11/0916/11/09

Fingerprint

Vernacular Architecture
Continuity
Log Cabin
Local History
History
Cross-cultural Encounters
Constellation
Indexing
Traders
Discourse
Cultural Exchange

Cite this

Building Log Cabins in Teetl'it Gwich'in Country : Vernacular Architecture, Local History, and Continuities. / Wishart, Robert.

2009. Paper presented at Chacmool conference, Calgary, Canada.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Wishart, R 2009, 'Building Log Cabins in Teetl'it Gwich'in Country: Vernacular Architecture, Local History, and Continuities' Paper presented at Chacmool conference, Calgary, Canada, 13/11/09 - 16/11/09, .
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