Candida albicans-epithelial interactions: dissecting the roles of active penetration, induced endocytosis and host factors on the infection process

Betty Wächtler, Francesco Citiulo, Nadja Jablonowski, Stephanie Förster, Frederic Dalle, Martin Schaller, Duncan Wilson, Bernhard Hube

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Abstract

Candida albicans frequently causes superficial infections by invading and damaging epithelial cells, but may also cause systemic infections by penetrating through epithelial barriers. C. albicans is a remarkable pathogen because it can invade epithelial cells via two distinct mechanisms: induced endocytosis, analogous to facultative intracellular enteropathogenic bacteria, and active penetration, similar to plant pathogenic fungi. Here we investigated the contributions of the two invasion routes of C. albicans to epithelial invasion. Using selective cellular inhibition approaches and differential fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that induced endocytosis contributes considerably to the early time points of invasion, while active penetration represents the dominant epithelial invasion route. Although induced endocytosis depends mainly on Als3-E-cadherin interactions, we observed E-cadherin independent induced endocytosis. Finally, we provide evidence of a protective role for serum factors in oral infection: human serum strongly inhibited C. albicans adhesion to, invasion and damage of oral epithelial cells.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere36952
JournalPloS ONE
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 May 2012

Fingerprint

Candida
endocytosis
Endocytosis
Candida albicans
Cadherins
epithelial cells
cadherins
Epithelial Cells
Infection
infection
mouth
Fluorescence microscopy
Pathogens
Fungi
Bacteria
plant pathogenic fungi
Adhesion
fluorescence microscopy
Serum
Fluorescence Microscopy

Keywords

  • blood physiological phenomena
  • cadherins
  • Candida albicans
  • candidiasis, oral
  • cell adhesion
  • cell line
  • endocytosis
  • epithelial cells
  • fungal proteins
  • host-pathogen interactions
  • humans
  • microscopy
  • mouth mucosa
  • electron
  • transmission

Cite this

Candida albicans-epithelial interactions : dissecting the roles of active penetration, induced endocytosis and host factors on the infection process. / Wächtler, Betty; Citiulo, Francesco; Jablonowski, Nadja; Förster, Stephanie; Dalle, Frederic; Schaller, Martin; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard.

In: PloS ONE, Vol. 7, No. 5, e36952, 14.05.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wächtler, B, Citiulo, F, Jablonowski, N, Förster, S, Dalle, F, Schaller, M, Wilson, D & Hube, B 2012, 'Candida albicans-epithelial interactions: dissecting the roles of active penetration, induced endocytosis and host factors on the infection process', PloS ONE, vol. 7, no. 5, e36952. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0036952
Wächtler, Betty ; Citiulo, Francesco ; Jablonowski, Nadja ; Förster, Stephanie ; Dalle, Frederic ; Schaller, Martin ; Wilson, Duncan ; Hube, Bernhard. / Candida albicans-epithelial interactions : dissecting the roles of active penetration, induced endocytosis and host factors on the infection process. In: PloS ONE. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 5.
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