Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model

D Baker, G Pryce, J L Croxford, P Brown, R G Pertwee, J W Huffman, L Layward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

439 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE) is an autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis(1). Although both these diseases are typified by relapsing-remitting paralytic episodes, after CREAE induction by sensitization to myelin antigens(1) Biozzi ABH mice also develop spasticity and tremor. These symptoms also occur during multiple sclerosis and are difficult to control. This has prompted some patients to find alternative medicines, and to perceive benefit from cannabis use(2), Although this benefit has been backed up by small clinical studies, mainly With non-quantifiable outcomes(3-7) the value of cannabis use in multiple sclerosis remains anecdotal. Here we show that cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonism using R(+)-WIN 55,212, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, methanandamide and JWH-133 (ref. 8) quantitatively ameliorated both tremor and spasticity in diseased mice. The exacerbation Of these signs after antagonism of the CB1 and CB2 receptors, notably the CB1 receptor, using SR141716A and SR144528 (ref. 8) indicative that the endogenous cannabinoid system may be tonically active in the control of tremor and spasticity. This provides a rationale for patients' indications of the therapeutic potential of cannabis in the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis(2), and provides a means of evaluating more selective cannabinoids in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-87
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume404
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS
  • CB1

Cite this

Baker, D., Pryce, G., Croxford, J. L., Brown, P., Pertwee, R. G., Huffman, J. W., & Layward, L. (2000). Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model. Nature, 404, 84-87.

Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model. / Baker, D ; Pryce, G ; Croxford, J L ; Brown, P ; Pertwee, R G ; Huffman, J W ; Layward, L .

In: Nature, Vol. 404, 2000, p. 84-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, D, Pryce, G, Croxford, JL, Brown, P, Pertwee, RG, Huffman, JW & Layward, L 2000, 'Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model' Nature, vol. 404, pp. 84-87.
Baker D, Pryce G, Croxford JL, Brown P, Pertwee RG, Huffman JW et al. Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model. Nature. 2000;404:84-87.
Baker, D ; Pryce, G ; Croxford, J L ; Brown, P ; Pertwee, R G ; Huffman, J W ; Layward, L . / Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model. In: Nature. 2000 ; Vol. 404. pp. 84-87.
@article{28c7cf3aa2d048708be4921d3ba22bca,
title = "Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model",
abstract = "Chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE) is an autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis(1). Although both these diseases are typified by relapsing-remitting paralytic episodes, after CREAE induction by sensitization to myelin antigens(1) Biozzi ABH mice also develop spasticity and tremor. These symptoms also occur during multiple sclerosis and are difficult to control. This has prompted some patients to find alternative medicines, and to perceive benefit from cannabis use(2), Although this benefit has been backed up by small clinical studies, mainly With non-quantifiable outcomes(3-7) the value of cannabis use in multiple sclerosis remains anecdotal. Here we show that cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonism using R(+)-WIN 55,212, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, methanandamide and JWH-133 (ref. 8) quantitatively ameliorated both tremor and spasticity in diseased mice. The exacerbation Of these signs after antagonism of the CB1 and CB2 receptors, notably the CB1 receptor, using SR141716A and SR144528 (ref. 8) indicative that the endogenous cannabinoid system may be tonically active in the control of tremor and spasticity. This provides a rationale for patients' indications of the therapeutic potential of cannabis in the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis(2), and provides a means of evaluating more selective cannabinoids in the future.",
keywords = "EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, CB1",
author = "D Baker and G Pryce and Croxford, {J L} and P Brown and Pertwee, {R G} and Huffman, {J W} and L Layward",
year = "2000",
language = "English",
volume = "404",
pages = "84--87",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model

AU - Baker, D

AU - Pryce, G

AU - Croxford, J L

AU - Brown, P

AU - Pertwee, R G

AU - Huffman, J W

AU - Layward, L

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE) is an autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis(1). Although both these diseases are typified by relapsing-remitting paralytic episodes, after CREAE induction by sensitization to myelin antigens(1) Biozzi ABH mice also develop spasticity and tremor. These symptoms also occur during multiple sclerosis and are difficult to control. This has prompted some patients to find alternative medicines, and to perceive benefit from cannabis use(2), Although this benefit has been backed up by small clinical studies, mainly With non-quantifiable outcomes(3-7) the value of cannabis use in multiple sclerosis remains anecdotal. Here we show that cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonism using R(+)-WIN 55,212, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, methanandamide and JWH-133 (ref. 8) quantitatively ameliorated both tremor and spasticity in diseased mice. The exacerbation Of these signs after antagonism of the CB1 and CB2 receptors, notably the CB1 receptor, using SR141716A and SR144528 (ref. 8) indicative that the endogenous cannabinoid system may be tonically active in the control of tremor and spasticity. This provides a rationale for patients' indications of the therapeutic potential of cannabis in the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis(2), and provides a means of evaluating more selective cannabinoids in the future.

AB - Chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE) is an autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis(1). Although both these diseases are typified by relapsing-remitting paralytic episodes, after CREAE induction by sensitization to myelin antigens(1) Biozzi ABH mice also develop spasticity and tremor. These symptoms also occur during multiple sclerosis and are difficult to control. This has prompted some patients to find alternative medicines, and to perceive benefit from cannabis use(2), Although this benefit has been backed up by small clinical studies, mainly With non-quantifiable outcomes(3-7) the value of cannabis use in multiple sclerosis remains anecdotal. Here we show that cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonism using R(+)-WIN 55,212, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, methanandamide and JWH-133 (ref. 8) quantitatively ameliorated both tremor and spasticity in diseased mice. The exacerbation Of these signs after antagonism of the CB1 and CB2 receptors, notably the CB1 receptor, using SR141716A and SR144528 (ref. 8) indicative that the endogenous cannabinoid system may be tonically active in the control of tremor and spasticity. This provides a rationale for patients' indications of the therapeutic potential of cannabis in the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis(2), and provides a means of evaluating more selective cannabinoids in the future.

KW - EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

KW - CB1

M3 - Article

VL - 404

SP - 84

EP - 87

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

ER -