Case study

a patient-clinician collaboration that identified and prioritized evidence gaps and stimulated research development

Brian S Buckley, Adrian M Grant, Cathryn M A Glazener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective
To assess the effect of a research prioritization partnership that aimed to influence the research agenda relating to urinary incontinence (UI).

Study Design and Setting
Research often neglects important gaps in existing evidence so that decisions must be made about treatments without reliable evidence of their effectiveness. In 2007–2009, a United Kingdom partnership of eight patient and 13 clinician organizations identified and prioritized gaps in the evidence that affect everyday decisions about treatment of UI. The top 10 prioritized research questions were published and reported to research funders in 2009. A year later, new research or funding applications relating to the prioritized topics were identified through reviews of research databases and consultation with funding organizations, elements of the research community, and organizations that participated in the partnership.

Results
Since dissemination of the prioritized topics, five studies are known to have been funded, three in development; five new systematic reviews are under way, one is being updated; five questions are under consideration by a national research commissioning body.

Conclusion
The partnership successfully developed and used a methodology for identification and prioritization of research needs through patient–clinician consensus. Prioritization through consensus can be effective in informing the development of clinically useful research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)483-489
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume66
Issue number5
Early online date4 Aug 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Research
Urinary Incontinence
Referral and Consultation
Databases
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • cooperative behavior
  • evidence-based medicine
  • female
  • Great Britain
  • health services research
  • humans
  • male
  • needs assessment
  • physician's practice patterns
  • physician-patient relations
  • research design
  • urinary incontinence

Cite this

Case study : a patient-clinician collaboration that identified and prioritized evidence gaps and stimulated research development. / Buckley, Brian S; Grant, Adrian M; Glazener, Cathryn M A.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 66, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 483-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1889cacfe70c4a72a42f0ee0937754a9,
title = "Case study: a patient-clinician collaboration that identified and prioritized evidence gaps and stimulated research development",
abstract = "ObjectiveTo assess the effect of a research prioritization partnership that aimed to influence the research agenda relating to urinary incontinence (UI).Study Design and SettingResearch often neglects important gaps in existing evidence so that decisions must be made about treatments without reliable evidence of their effectiveness. In 2007–2009, a United Kingdom partnership of eight patient and 13 clinician organizations identified and prioritized gaps in the evidence that affect everyday decisions about treatment of UI. The top 10 prioritized research questions were published and reported to research funders in 2009. A year later, new research or funding applications relating to the prioritized topics were identified through reviews of research databases and consultation with funding organizations, elements of the research community, and organizations that participated in the partnership.ResultsSince dissemination of the prioritized topics, five studies are known to have been funded, three in development; five new systematic reviews are under way, one is being updated; five questions are under consideration by a national research commissioning body.ConclusionThe partnership successfully developed and used a methodology for identification and prioritization of research needs through patient–clinician consensus. Prioritization through consensus can be effective in informing the development of clinically useful research.",
keywords = "cooperative behavior, evidence-based medicine, female, Great Britain, health services research, humans, male, needs assessment, physician's practice patterns, physician-patient relations, research design, urinary incontinence",
author = "Buckley, {Brian S} and Grant, {Adrian M} and Glazener, {Cathryn M A}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.jclinepi.2011.03.016",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "483--489",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Epidemiology",
issn = "0895-4356",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Case study

T2 - a patient-clinician collaboration that identified and prioritized evidence gaps and stimulated research development

AU - Buckley, Brian S

AU - Grant, Adrian M

AU - Glazener, Cathryn M A

N1 - Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2013/5

Y1 - 2013/5

N2 - ObjectiveTo assess the effect of a research prioritization partnership that aimed to influence the research agenda relating to urinary incontinence (UI).Study Design and SettingResearch often neglects important gaps in existing evidence so that decisions must be made about treatments without reliable evidence of their effectiveness. In 2007–2009, a United Kingdom partnership of eight patient and 13 clinician organizations identified and prioritized gaps in the evidence that affect everyday decisions about treatment of UI. The top 10 prioritized research questions were published and reported to research funders in 2009. A year later, new research or funding applications relating to the prioritized topics were identified through reviews of research databases and consultation with funding organizations, elements of the research community, and organizations that participated in the partnership.ResultsSince dissemination of the prioritized topics, five studies are known to have been funded, three in development; five new systematic reviews are under way, one is being updated; five questions are under consideration by a national research commissioning body.ConclusionThe partnership successfully developed and used a methodology for identification and prioritization of research needs through patient–clinician consensus. Prioritization through consensus can be effective in informing the development of clinically useful research.

AB - ObjectiveTo assess the effect of a research prioritization partnership that aimed to influence the research agenda relating to urinary incontinence (UI).Study Design and SettingResearch often neglects important gaps in existing evidence so that decisions must be made about treatments without reliable evidence of their effectiveness. In 2007–2009, a United Kingdom partnership of eight patient and 13 clinician organizations identified and prioritized gaps in the evidence that affect everyday decisions about treatment of UI. The top 10 prioritized research questions were published and reported to research funders in 2009. A year later, new research or funding applications relating to the prioritized topics were identified through reviews of research databases and consultation with funding organizations, elements of the research community, and organizations that participated in the partnership.ResultsSince dissemination of the prioritized topics, five studies are known to have been funded, three in development; five new systematic reviews are under way, one is being updated; five questions are under consideration by a national research commissioning body.ConclusionThe partnership successfully developed and used a methodology for identification and prioritization of research needs through patient–clinician consensus. Prioritization through consensus can be effective in informing the development of clinically useful research.

KW - cooperative behavior

KW - evidence-based medicine

KW - female

KW - Great Britain

KW - health services research

KW - humans

KW - male

KW - needs assessment

KW - physician's practice patterns

KW - physician-patient relations

KW - research design

KW - urinary incontinence

U2 - 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2011.03.016

DO - 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2011.03.016

M3 - Article

VL - 66

SP - 483

EP - 489

JO - Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

JF - Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

SN - 0895-4356

IS - 5

ER -