Case Study

Muscle Atrophy, Hypertrophy, and Energy Expenditure of a Premier League Soccer Player During Rehabilitation From Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

Liam Anderson, Graeme L Close, Matt Konopinksi, David Rydings, Jordan Milsom, Catherine Hambly, John Roger Speakman, Barry Drust, James P Morton (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Maintaining muscle mass and function during rehabilitation from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is complicated by the challenge of accurately prescribing daily energy intakes aligned to energy expenditure. Accordingly, we present a 38-week case study characterizing whole body and regional rates of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy (as inferred by assessments of fat free mass from DXA) in a professional male soccer player from the English Premier League. Additionally, in week 6 we also quantified energy intake (via the remote food photographic method) and energy expenditure using the doubly labeled water method. Mean daily energy intake (CHO: 1.9-3.2, Protein: 1.7-3.3 and Fat: 1.4-2.7 g.kg-1) and energy expenditure was 2765 ± 474 and 3178 kcal.d-1 respectively. In accordance with an apparent energy deficit, total body mass decreased by 1.9 kg during week 1-6 where FFM loss in the injured and non-injured limb was 0.9 and 0.6 kg, respectively, yet, trunk FFM increased by 0.7 kg. In weeks 7-28, the athlete was advised to increased daily CHO intake (4-6 g.kg-1) to facilitate an increased daily energy intake. Throughout this period, total body mass increased by 3.6 kg (attributable to a 2.9 and 0.7 kg increase in fat-free and fat mass, respectively). Our data suggest it may be advantageous to avoid excessive reductions in energy intake during the initial 6-8 weeks post-ACL surgery so as to limit muscle atrophy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-566
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Volume29
Issue number5
Early online date29 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

anterior cruciate ligament
muscular atrophy
Soccer
Muscular Atrophy
rehabilitation (people)
Energy Intake
hypertrophy
energy expenditure
Hypertrophy
Energy Metabolism
energy intake
Rehabilitation
case studies
Fats
lipids
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
athletes
limbs (animal)
Athletes
Extremities

Keywords

  • Carbohydrate
  • Protein
  • knee
  • doubly labeled water
  • protein
  • carbohydrate
  • FOOTBALL
  • SPORT
  • ACL RECONSTRUCTION
  • RISK
  • BODY-COMPOSITION
  • STRATEGIES
  • RETURN

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Case Study : Muscle Atrophy, Hypertrophy, and Energy Expenditure of a Premier League Soccer Player During Rehabilitation From Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury. / Anderson, Liam; Close, Graeme L; Konopinksi, Matt; Rydings, David; Milsom, Jordan; Hambly, Catherine; Speakman, John Roger; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P (Corresponding Author).

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.09.2019, p. 559-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ef7ce84ddeff463da13d714bf701f1ff,
title = "Case Study: Muscle Atrophy, Hypertrophy, and Energy Expenditure of a Premier League Soccer Player During Rehabilitation From Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury",
abstract = "Maintaining muscle mass and function during rehabilitation from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is complicated by the challenge of accurately prescribing daily energy intakes aligned to energy expenditure. Accordingly, we present a 38-week case study characterizing whole body and regional rates of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy (as inferred by assessments of fat free mass from DXA) in a professional male soccer player from the English Premier League. Additionally, in week 6 we also quantified energy intake (via the remote food photographic method) and energy expenditure using the doubly labeled water method. Mean daily energy intake (CHO: 1.9-3.2, Protein: 1.7-3.3 and Fat: 1.4-2.7 g.kg-1) and energy expenditure was 2765 ± 474 and 3178 kcal.d-1 respectively. In accordance with an apparent energy deficit, total body mass decreased by 1.9 kg during week 1-6 where FFM loss in the injured and non-injured limb was 0.9 and 0.6 kg, respectively, yet, trunk FFM increased by 0.7 kg. In weeks 7-28, the athlete was advised to increased daily CHO intake (4-6 g.kg-1) to facilitate an increased daily energy intake. Throughout this period, total body mass increased by 3.6 kg (attributable to a 2.9 and 0.7 kg increase in fat-free and fat mass, respectively). Our data suggest it may be advantageous to avoid excessive reductions in energy intake during the initial 6-8 weeks post-ACL surgery so as to limit muscle atrophy.",
keywords = "Carbohydrate, Protein, knee, doubly labeled water, protein, carbohydrate, FOOTBALL, SPORT, ACL RECONSTRUCTION, RISK, BODY-COMPOSITION, STRATEGIES, RETURN",
author = "Liam Anderson and Close, {Graeme L} and Matt Konopinksi and David Rydings and Jordan Milsom and Catherine Hambly and Speakman, {John Roger} and Barry Drust and Morton, {James P}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0391",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "559--566",
journal = "International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism",
issn = "1050-1606",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Case Study

T2 - Muscle Atrophy, Hypertrophy, and Energy Expenditure of a Premier League Soccer Player During Rehabilitation From Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

AU - Anderson, Liam

AU - Close, Graeme L

AU - Konopinksi, Matt

AU - Rydings, David

AU - Milsom, Jordan

AU - Hambly, Catherine

AU - Speakman, John Roger

AU - Drust, Barry

AU - Morton, James P

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - Maintaining muscle mass and function during rehabilitation from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is complicated by the challenge of accurately prescribing daily energy intakes aligned to energy expenditure. Accordingly, we present a 38-week case study characterizing whole body and regional rates of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy (as inferred by assessments of fat free mass from DXA) in a professional male soccer player from the English Premier League. Additionally, in week 6 we also quantified energy intake (via the remote food photographic method) and energy expenditure using the doubly labeled water method. Mean daily energy intake (CHO: 1.9-3.2, Protein: 1.7-3.3 and Fat: 1.4-2.7 g.kg-1) and energy expenditure was 2765 ± 474 and 3178 kcal.d-1 respectively. In accordance with an apparent energy deficit, total body mass decreased by 1.9 kg during week 1-6 where FFM loss in the injured and non-injured limb was 0.9 and 0.6 kg, respectively, yet, trunk FFM increased by 0.7 kg. In weeks 7-28, the athlete was advised to increased daily CHO intake (4-6 g.kg-1) to facilitate an increased daily energy intake. Throughout this period, total body mass increased by 3.6 kg (attributable to a 2.9 and 0.7 kg increase in fat-free and fat mass, respectively). Our data suggest it may be advantageous to avoid excessive reductions in energy intake during the initial 6-8 weeks post-ACL surgery so as to limit muscle atrophy.

AB - Maintaining muscle mass and function during rehabilitation from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is complicated by the challenge of accurately prescribing daily energy intakes aligned to energy expenditure. Accordingly, we present a 38-week case study characterizing whole body and regional rates of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy (as inferred by assessments of fat free mass from DXA) in a professional male soccer player from the English Premier League. Additionally, in week 6 we also quantified energy intake (via the remote food photographic method) and energy expenditure using the doubly labeled water method. Mean daily energy intake (CHO: 1.9-3.2, Protein: 1.7-3.3 and Fat: 1.4-2.7 g.kg-1) and energy expenditure was 2765 ± 474 and 3178 kcal.d-1 respectively. In accordance with an apparent energy deficit, total body mass decreased by 1.9 kg during week 1-6 where FFM loss in the injured and non-injured limb was 0.9 and 0.6 kg, respectively, yet, trunk FFM increased by 0.7 kg. In weeks 7-28, the athlete was advised to increased daily CHO intake (4-6 g.kg-1) to facilitate an increased daily energy intake. Throughout this period, total body mass increased by 3.6 kg (attributable to a 2.9 and 0.7 kg increase in fat-free and fat mass, respectively). Our data suggest it may be advantageous to avoid excessive reductions in energy intake during the initial 6-8 weeks post-ACL surgery so as to limit muscle atrophy.

KW - Carbohydrate

KW - Protein

KW - knee

KW - doubly labeled water

KW - protein

KW - carbohydrate

KW - FOOTBALL

KW - SPORT

KW - ACL RECONSTRUCTION

KW - RISK

KW - BODY-COMPOSITION

KW - STRATEGIES

KW - RETURN

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/case-study-muscle-atrophy-hypertrophy-energy-expenditure-premier-league-soccer-player-during-rehabil

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071784273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0391

DO - 10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0391

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 559

EP - 566

JO - International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism

JF - International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism

SN - 1050-1606

IS - 5

ER -