Cell signal mechanisms, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) and anti-tumorigenesis

K. W. Wahle, Steven Darryll Heys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fats have been adversely implicated in the aetiology of many forms of cancer yet evidence is accumulating that certain types of fatty acids have anticancer properties. This is well documented for fish-oil fatty acids of the n-3 family. Recently, fatty acids found to occur naturally in ruminant-derived food products were found to have anticancer properties. These fatty acids were identified as conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) derived from the parent linoleic acid by its partial hydrogenation by rumen bacteria. Studies with tumour-bearing animals have shown that consumption of CLAs particularly with regard to breast and prostate cancer is beneficial.

Studies with cancer cells have also shown that these fatty acids can inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell death. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms of action of these CLAs. In particular, which cellular signal mechanisms are regulated by CLAs which can explain their anticancer properties.

We have shown that CLAs specifically up-regulate cell signal systems at the level of gene expression (mRNA, protein) in human breast and prostate cancer cells which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis or programmed cell death. These findings support the anticancer effects of CLA found in animal models and indicate similar effects could occur in man. Crown Copyright (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-186
Number of pages3
JournalProstaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids
Volume67
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • BREAST-CANCER RISK
  • MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELLS
  • EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID
  • INDUCED APOPTOSIS
  • POOR RESPONSE
  • BCL-2
  • DIET
  • CHEMOTHERAPY
  • CONSUMPTION
  • PROTEIN

Cite this

Cell signal mechanisms, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) and anti-tumorigenesis. / Wahle, K. W.; Heys, Steven Darryll.

In: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, Vol. 67, No. 2-3, 2002, p. 183-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c675af9040fd4495aec235ffa4e71466,
title = "Cell signal mechanisms, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) and anti-tumorigenesis",
abstract = "Fats have been adversely implicated in the aetiology of many forms of cancer yet evidence is accumulating that certain types of fatty acids have anticancer properties. This is well documented for fish-oil fatty acids of the n-3 family. Recently, fatty acids found to occur naturally in ruminant-derived food products were found to have anticancer properties. These fatty acids were identified as conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) derived from the parent linoleic acid by its partial hydrogenation by rumen bacteria. Studies with tumour-bearing animals have shown that consumption of CLAs particularly with regard to breast and prostate cancer is beneficial.Studies with cancer cells have also shown that these fatty acids can inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell death. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms of action of these CLAs. In particular, which cellular signal mechanisms are regulated by CLAs which can explain their anticancer properties.We have shown that CLAs specifically up-regulate cell signal systems at the level of gene expression (mRNA, protein) in human breast and prostate cancer cells which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis or programmed cell death. These findings support the anticancer effects of CLA found in animal models and indicate similar effects could occur in man. Crown Copyright (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "BREAST-CANCER RISK, MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELLS, EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID, INDUCED APOPTOSIS, POOR RESPONSE, BCL-2, DIET, CHEMOTHERAPY, CONSUMPTION, PROTEIN",
author = "Wahle, {K. W.} and Heys, {Steven Darryll}",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1054/plef.2002.0416",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
pages = "183--186",
journal = "Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids",
issn = "0952-3278",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cell signal mechanisms, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) and anti-tumorigenesis

AU - Wahle, K. W.

AU - Heys, Steven Darryll

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Fats have been adversely implicated in the aetiology of many forms of cancer yet evidence is accumulating that certain types of fatty acids have anticancer properties. This is well documented for fish-oil fatty acids of the n-3 family. Recently, fatty acids found to occur naturally in ruminant-derived food products were found to have anticancer properties. These fatty acids were identified as conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) derived from the parent linoleic acid by its partial hydrogenation by rumen bacteria. Studies with tumour-bearing animals have shown that consumption of CLAs particularly with regard to breast and prostate cancer is beneficial.Studies with cancer cells have also shown that these fatty acids can inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell death. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms of action of these CLAs. In particular, which cellular signal mechanisms are regulated by CLAs which can explain their anticancer properties.We have shown that CLAs specifically up-regulate cell signal systems at the level of gene expression (mRNA, protein) in human breast and prostate cancer cells which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis or programmed cell death. These findings support the anticancer effects of CLA found in animal models and indicate similar effects could occur in man. Crown Copyright (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Fats have been adversely implicated in the aetiology of many forms of cancer yet evidence is accumulating that certain types of fatty acids have anticancer properties. This is well documented for fish-oil fatty acids of the n-3 family. Recently, fatty acids found to occur naturally in ruminant-derived food products were found to have anticancer properties. These fatty acids were identified as conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) derived from the parent linoleic acid by its partial hydrogenation by rumen bacteria. Studies with tumour-bearing animals have shown that consumption of CLAs particularly with regard to breast and prostate cancer is beneficial.Studies with cancer cells have also shown that these fatty acids can inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell death. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms of action of these CLAs. In particular, which cellular signal mechanisms are regulated by CLAs which can explain their anticancer properties.We have shown that CLAs specifically up-regulate cell signal systems at the level of gene expression (mRNA, protein) in human breast and prostate cancer cells which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis or programmed cell death. These findings support the anticancer effects of CLA found in animal models and indicate similar effects could occur in man. Crown Copyright (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - BREAST-CANCER RISK

KW - MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELLS

KW - EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID

KW - INDUCED APOPTOSIS

KW - POOR RESPONSE

KW - BCL-2

KW - DIET

KW - CHEMOTHERAPY

KW - CONSUMPTION

KW - PROTEIN

U2 - 10.1054/plef.2002.0416

DO - 10.1054/plef.2002.0416

M3 - Article

VL - 67

SP - 183

EP - 186

JO - Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids

JF - Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids

SN - 0952-3278

IS - 2-3

ER -