Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

K. R. Muir, M. J. Lima, H. M. Docherty, K. Docherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Cell therapy in the form of human islet transplantation has been a successful form of treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes for over 10 years, but is significantly limited by lack of suitable donor material. A replenishable supply of insulin-producing cells has the potential to address this problem; however to date success has been limited to a few preclinical studies. Two of the most promising strategies include differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells towards insulin-producing cells and transdifferentiation of acinar or other closely related cell types towards β-cells. Here, we discuss recent progress and challenges that need to be overcome in taking cell therapy to the clinic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-259
Number of pages7
JournalQJM
Volume107
Issue number4
Early online date29 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Fingerprint

Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Cell Transdifferentiation
Insulin
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Embryonic Stem Cells
Tissue Donors
Therapeutics

Cite this

Muir, K. R., Lima, M. J., Docherty, H. M., & Docherty, K. (2014). Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes. QJM, 107(4), 253-259. https://doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hcu025

Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes. / Muir, K. R.; Lima, M. J.; Docherty, H. M.; Docherty, K.

In: QJM, Vol. 107, No. 4, 04.2014, p. 253-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muir, KR, Lima, MJ, Docherty, HM & Docherty, K 2014, 'Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes', QJM, vol. 107, no. 4, pp. 253-259. https://doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hcu025
Muir KR, Lima MJ, Docherty HM, Docherty K. Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes. QJM. 2014 Apr;107(4):253-259. https://doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hcu025
Muir, K. R. ; Lima, M. J. ; Docherty, H. M. ; Docherty, K. / Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes. In: QJM. 2014 ; Vol. 107, No. 4. pp. 253-259.
@article{06c2b575fc764e9997fcbded2aed7193,
title = "Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes",
abstract = "Cell therapy in the form of human islet transplantation has been a successful form of treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes for over 10 years, but is significantly limited by lack of suitable donor material. A replenishable supply of insulin-producing cells has the potential to address this problem; however to date success has been limited to a few preclinical studies. Two of the most promising strategies include differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells towards insulin-producing cells and transdifferentiation of acinar or other closely related cell types towards β-cells. Here, we discuss recent progress and challenges that need to be overcome in taking cell therapy to the clinic.",
author = "Muir, {K. R.} and Lima, {M. J.} and Docherty, {H. M.} and K. Docherty",
note = "Acknowledgements The work described in this review was supported by a grant from the MRC. K.R.M. is supported by a fellowship from the Scottish Translational Medicines and Therapeutics Initiative through the Wellcome Trust.",
year = "2014",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1093/qjmed/hcu025",
language = "English",
volume = "107",
pages = "253--259",
journal = "QJM",
issn = "1460-2725",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cell Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

AU - Muir, K. R.

AU - Lima, M. J.

AU - Docherty, H. M.

AU - Docherty, K.

N1 - Acknowledgements The work described in this review was supported by a grant from the MRC. K.R.M. is supported by a fellowship from the Scottish Translational Medicines and Therapeutics Initiative through the Wellcome Trust.

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - Cell therapy in the form of human islet transplantation has been a successful form of treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes for over 10 years, but is significantly limited by lack of suitable donor material. A replenishable supply of insulin-producing cells has the potential to address this problem; however to date success has been limited to a few preclinical studies. Two of the most promising strategies include differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells towards insulin-producing cells and transdifferentiation of acinar or other closely related cell types towards β-cells. Here, we discuss recent progress and challenges that need to be overcome in taking cell therapy to the clinic.

AB - Cell therapy in the form of human islet transplantation has been a successful form of treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes for over 10 years, but is significantly limited by lack of suitable donor material. A replenishable supply of insulin-producing cells has the potential to address this problem; however to date success has been limited to a few preclinical studies. Two of the most promising strategies include differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells towards insulin-producing cells and transdifferentiation of acinar or other closely related cell types towards β-cells. Here, we discuss recent progress and challenges that need to be overcome in taking cell therapy to the clinic.

U2 - 10.1093/qjmed/hcu025

DO - 10.1093/qjmed/hcu025

M3 - Article

VL - 107

SP - 253

EP - 259

JO - QJM

JF - QJM

SN - 1460-2725

IS - 4

ER -