Central Nervous System Parasitosis and Neuroinflammation Ameliorated by Systemic IL-10 Administration in Trypanosoma brucei-Infected Mice

Jean Rodgers, Barbara BRADLEY, Peter G.E. Kennedy, Jeremy M Sternberg (Corresponding Author)

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Abstract

Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) by African trypanosomes represents a critical step in the development of human African trypanosomiasis. In both clinical cases and experimental mouse infections it has been demonstrated that predisposition to CNS invasion is associated with a type 1 systemic inflammatory response. Using the Trypanosoma brucei brucei GVR35 experimental infection model, we demonstrate that systemic delivery of the counter-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 lowers plasma IFN-γ and TNF-α concentrations, CNS parasitosis and ameliorates neuro-inflammatory pathology and clinical symptoms of disease. The results provide evidence that CNS invasion may be susceptible to immunological attenuation.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0004201
Number of pages9
JournalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Volume9
Issue number10
Early online date27 Oct 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2015

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Trypanosoma brucei brucei
Interleukin-10
Central Nervous System
African Trypanosomiasis
Clinical Pathology
Trypanosomiasis
Human Development
Infection
Theoretical Models
Cytokines

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Central Nervous System Parasitosis and Neuroinflammation Ameliorated by Systemic IL-10 Administration in Trypanosoma brucei-Infected Mice. / Rodgers, Jean; BRADLEY, Barbara; Kennedy, Peter G.E.; Sternberg, Jeremy M (Corresponding Author).

In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol. 9, No. 10, e0004201, 27.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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