Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion

Maria J. Vazquez, C. Ruth Gonzalez, Luis Varela, Ricardo Lage, Sulay Tovar, Susana Sangiao-Alvarellos, Lynda Williams, Antonio Vidal-Puig, Ruben Nogueiras, Miguel Lopez, Carlos Dieguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence suggests that the adipocyte-derived hormone resistin (RSTN) directly regulates both feeding and peripheral metabolism through, so far, undefined hypothalamic mediated mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the anorectic effect of RSTN is associated with inappropriately decreased mRNA expression of orexigenic (agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y) and increased mRNA expression of anorexigenic (cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript) neuropeptides in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Of interest, RSTN also exerts a profound nutrition-dependent inhibitory effect on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by increased phosphorylation levels of both AMP-activated protein kinase and its downstream target acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, associated with decreased expression of fatty acid synthase in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, we also demonstrate that chronic central RSTN infusion results in decreased body weight and major changes in peripheral expression of lipogenic enzymes, in a tissue-specific and nutrition-dependent manner. Thus, in the fed state central RSTN is associated with induced expression of fatty acid synthesis enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines in liver, whereas its administration in the fasted state does so in white adipose tissue. Overall, our results indicate that RSTN controls feeding and peripheral lipid metabolism and suggest that hepatic RSTN-induced insulin resistance may be mediated by central activation of de novo lipogenesis in liver.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4534-4543
Number of pages10
JournalEndocrinology
Volume149
Issue number9
Early online date22 May 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

Keywords

  • hepatic insulin-resistance
  • activated protein-kinase
  • central-nervous-system
  • fatty-acid-metabolism
  • food-intake
  • gene-expression
  • glucose-homeostasis
  • energy homeostasis
  • induced anorexia
  • neuropeptide-Y

Cite this

Vazquez, M. J., Gonzalez, C. R., Varela, L., Lage, R., Tovar, S., Sangiao-Alvarellos, S., ... Dieguez, C. (2008). Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion. Endocrinology, 149(9), 4534-4543. https://doi.org/10.1210/en.2007-1708

Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion. / Vazquez, Maria J.; Gonzalez, C. Ruth; Varela, Luis; Lage, Ricardo; Tovar, Sulay; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Williams, Lynda; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Nogueiras, Ruben; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos.

In: Endocrinology, Vol. 149, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 4534-4543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vazquez, MJ, Gonzalez, CR, Varela, L, Lage, R, Tovar, S, Sangiao-Alvarellos, S, Williams, L, Vidal-Puig, A, Nogueiras, R, Lopez, M & Dieguez, C 2008, 'Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion', Endocrinology, vol. 149, no. 9, pp. 4534-4543. https://doi.org/10.1210/en.2007-1708
Vazquez MJ, Gonzalez CR, Varela L, Lage R, Tovar S, Sangiao-Alvarellos S et al. Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion. Endocrinology. 2008 Sep;149(9):4534-4543. https://doi.org/10.1210/en.2007-1708
Vazquez, Maria J. ; Gonzalez, C. Ruth ; Varela, Luis ; Lage, Ricardo ; Tovar, Sulay ; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana ; Williams, Lynda ; Vidal-Puig, Antonio ; Nogueiras, Ruben ; Lopez, Miguel ; Dieguez, Carlos. / Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion. In: Endocrinology. 2008 ; Vol. 149, No. 9. pp. 4534-4543.
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AU - Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana

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