Change in food and energy consumption among the ultra poor: Is the poverty reduction programme making a difference?

Farhana Haseen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Poverty persists at an alarming level in Bangladesh. To reduce extreme poverty and create the foundation for a sustainable livelihood change, BRAC undertook a targeted programme since 2002 named, Challenging the Frontiers of Poverty Reduction/Targeting the Ultra Poor (CFPR/TUP).

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the CFPR/TUP programme on food and energy consumption.

DESIGN: Two cross sectional surveys on food consumption were conducted, a pre-intervention survey in 2002 and a post-intervention survey in 2004 covering 180 intervention and 193 non-intervention households. Three days' recall method was administrated in both the survey rounds.

RESULTS: The baseline food consumption survey showed an inadequate food intake in all households, which did not differ between the two groups. At post-intervention, the quality and quantity of food intake improved significantly in the intervention households as compared to baseline. In this group, the consumption of various food items such as rice, pulse, vegetables, fish, fruit, milk and egg showed significant improvement (p<0.001), particularly, the level of fish consumption doubled in intervention households while in control households it remained almost unchanged (14 g/day to 27 g/day for intervention vs. 11 g/day to 13 g/day for control). Energy intake increased from 1750+/-650 Kcal/day to 2138+/-704 Kcal/day in intervention households (p<0.001), whereas no significant change was observed in control households. Percentages of energy from cereals decreased from 85% to 78% in intervention households (p<0.001) while it remained unchanged in control households.

CONCLUSION: CFPR/TUP programme seems to have direct impact on ultra poor family's ability to significantly increase consumption of food and energy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-64
Number of pages8
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume16
Issue number Suppl 1
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Poverty
Food
Fishes
Eating
Aptitude
Bangladesh
Energy Intake
Vegetables
Ovum
Fruit
Milk
Cross-Sectional Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Change in food and energy consumption among the ultra poor : Is the poverty reduction programme making a difference? / Haseen, Farhana.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 16, No. Suppl 1, 2007, p. 58-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Poverty persists at an alarming level in Bangladesh. To reduce extreme poverty and create the foundation for a sustainable livelihood change, BRAC undertook a targeted programme since 2002 named, Challenging the Frontiers of Poverty Reduction/Targeting the Ultra Poor (CFPR/TUP). OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the CFPR/TUP programme on food and energy consumption. DESIGN: Two cross sectional surveys on food consumption were conducted, a pre-intervention survey in 2002 and a post-intervention survey in 2004 covering 180 intervention and 193 non-intervention households. Three days' recall method was administrated in both the survey rounds. RESULTS: The baseline food consumption survey showed an inadequate food intake in all households, which did not differ between the two groups. At post-intervention, the quality and quantity of food intake improved significantly in the intervention households as compared to baseline. In this group, the consumption of various food items such as rice, pulse, vegetables, fish, fruit, milk and egg showed significant improvement (p<0.001), particularly, the level of fish consumption doubled in intervention households while in control households it remained almost unchanged (14 g/day to 27 g/day for intervention vs. 11 g/day to 13 g/day for control). Energy intake increased from 1750+/-650 Kcal/day to 2138+/-704 Kcal/day in intervention households (p<0.001), whereas no significant change was observed in control households. Percentages of energy from cereals decreased from 85{\%} to 78{\%} in intervention households (p<0.001) while it remained unchanged in control households. CONCLUSION: CFPR/TUP programme seems to have direct impact on ultra poor family's ability to significantly increase consumption of food and energy.",
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