Changes in Skiing and Snowboarding Injury Epidemiology and Attitudes to Safety in Big Sky, Montana, USA

A Comparison of 2 Cross-sectional Studies in 1996 and 2013

Edward Patrick, Jamie G Cooper, Jeff Daniels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite a risk of harm, the past 20 years have seen dramatically increased participation in snow sports such as skiing, and particularly, snowboarding. This period has also seen revolutions in piste maintenance and paradigm developments in the use of safety equipment. Consequently, the numbers and characteristics of injury may be very different from those traditionally quoted.

PURPOSE: To compare and evaluate the injury patterns among skiers and snowboarders in a North American ski resort in 1996 and 2013.

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

METHODS: Questionnaire-based cross-sectional studies were carried out independently in a North American ski resort between the dates of March 6 and April 11 in both 1996 and 2013. Demographic data and information about incident circumstances were collected from injured patients who visited the local on-site clinic. Data were compared statistically to assess for significant changes in injury characteristics between the 2 time periods.

RESULTS: The 1996 report consisted of 148 injured participants, and the 2013 study included 156 participants. Results from 2013 demonstrated significant increases in helmet use, the number of snowboarders injured, and shoulder injuries. Injury was also more likely in those aged 46 to 55 years, those never having had professional instruction, or those with rented equipment. Significant reductions were seen in those injured with other people close by and in the 36- to 45-year age group. Overall, the knee was the most commonly injured body part in both periods (1996: 31%, n = 38; 2013: 33%, n = 36), although upper limb injuries were predominant in snowboarders.

CONCLUSION: Snow sports injury characteristics of patients presenting to a ski resort medical clinic have changed between 1996 and 2013. These findings can be used to further inform safety recommendations and areas to target with further research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2325967115588280
Number of pages6
JournalOrthopaedic journal of sports medicine
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

Fingerprint

Skiing
Epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Snow Sports
Safety
Wounds and Injuries
Equipment Safety
Head Protective Devices
Athletic Injuries
Human Body
Upper Extremity
Knee
Age Groups
Maintenance
Demography
Equipment and Supplies
Research

Keywords

  • skiing injuries
  • snowboarding injuries
  • snow sports

Cite this

Changes in Skiing and Snowboarding Injury Epidemiology and Attitudes to Safety in Big Sky, Montana, USA : A Comparison of 2 Cross-sectional Studies in 1996 and 2013. / Patrick, Edward; Cooper, Jamie G; Daniels, Jeff.

In: Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine, Vol. 3, No. 6, 2325967115588280, 06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b60864ac9a2647a190d1fe6298545b4d,
title = "Changes in Skiing and Snowboarding Injury Epidemiology and Attitudes to Safety in Big Sky, Montana, USA: A Comparison of 2 Cross-sectional Studies in 1996 and 2013",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Despite a risk of harm, the past 20 years have seen dramatically increased participation in snow sports such as skiing, and particularly, snowboarding. This period has also seen revolutions in piste maintenance and paradigm developments in the use of safety equipment. Consequently, the numbers and characteristics of injury may be very different from those traditionally quoted.PURPOSE: To compare and evaluate the injury patterns among skiers and snowboarders in a North American ski resort in 1996 and 2013.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.METHODS: Questionnaire-based cross-sectional studies were carried out independently in a North American ski resort between the dates of March 6 and April 11 in both 1996 and 2013. Demographic data and information about incident circumstances were collected from injured patients who visited the local on-site clinic. Data were compared statistically to assess for significant changes in injury characteristics between the 2 time periods.RESULTS: The 1996 report consisted of 148 injured participants, and the 2013 study included 156 participants. Results from 2013 demonstrated significant increases in helmet use, the number of snowboarders injured, and shoulder injuries. Injury was also more likely in those aged 46 to 55 years, those never having had professional instruction, or those with rented equipment. Significant reductions were seen in those injured with other people close by and in the 36- to 45-year age group. Overall, the knee was the most commonly injured body part in both periods (1996: 31{\%}, n = 38; 2013: 33{\%}, n = 36), although upper limb injuries were predominant in snowboarders.CONCLUSION: Snow sports injury characteristics of patients presenting to a ski resort medical clinic have changed between 1996 and 2013. These findings can be used to further inform safety recommendations and areas to target with further research.",
keywords = "skiing injuries, snowboarding injuries, snow sports",
author = "Edward Patrick and Cooper, {Jamie G} and Jeff Daniels",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1177/2325967115588280",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
journal = "Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine",
issn = "2325-9671",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in Skiing and Snowboarding Injury Epidemiology and Attitudes to Safety in Big Sky, Montana, USA

T2 - A Comparison of 2 Cross-sectional Studies in 1996 and 2013

AU - Patrick, Edward

AU - Cooper, Jamie G

AU - Daniels, Jeff

PY - 2015/6

Y1 - 2015/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite a risk of harm, the past 20 years have seen dramatically increased participation in snow sports such as skiing, and particularly, snowboarding. This period has also seen revolutions in piste maintenance and paradigm developments in the use of safety equipment. Consequently, the numbers and characteristics of injury may be very different from those traditionally quoted.PURPOSE: To compare and evaluate the injury patterns among skiers and snowboarders in a North American ski resort in 1996 and 2013.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.METHODS: Questionnaire-based cross-sectional studies were carried out independently in a North American ski resort between the dates of March 6 and April 11 in both 1996 and 2013. Demographic data and information about incident circumstances were collected from injured patients who visited the local on-site clinic. Data were compared statistically to assess for significant changes in injury characteristics between the 2 time periods.RESULTS: The 1996 report consisted of 148 injured participants, and the 2013 study included 156 participants. Results from 2013 demonstrated significant increases in helmet use, the number of snowboarders injured, and shoulder injuries. Injury was also more likely in those aged 46 to 55 years, those never having had professional instruction, or those with rented equipment. Significant reductions were seen in those injured with other people close by and in the 36- to 45-year age group. Overall, the knee was the most commonly injured body part in both periods (1996: 31%, n = 38; 2013: 33%, n = 36), although upper limb injuries were predominant in snowboarders.CONCLUSION: Snow sports injury characteristics of patients presenting to a ski resort medical clinic have changed between 1996 and 2013. These findings can be used to further inform safety recommendations and areas to target with further research.

AB - BACKGROUND: Despite a risk of harm, the past 20 years have seen dramatically increased participation in snow sports such as skiing, and particularly, snowboarding. This period has also seen revolutions in piste maintenance and paradigm developments in the use of safety equipment. Consequently, the numbers and characteristics of injury may be very different from those traditionally quoted.PURPOSE: To compare and evaluate the injury patterns among skiers and snowboarders in a North American ski resort in 1996 and 2013.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.METHODS: Questionnaire-based cross-sectional studies were carried out independently in a North American ski resort between the dates of March 6 and April 11 in both 1996 and 2013. Demographic data and information about incident circumstances were collected from injured patients who visited the local on-site clinic. Data were compared statistically to assess for significant changes in injury characteristics between the 2 time periods.RESULTS: The 1996 report consisted of 148 injured participants, and the 2013 study included 156 participants. Results from 2013 demonstrated significant increases in helmet use, the number of snowboarders injured, and shoulder injuries. Injury was also more likely in those aged 46 to 55 years, those never having had professional instruction, or those with rented equipment. Significant reductions were seen in those injured with other people close by and in the 36- to 45-year age group. Overall, the knee was the most commonly injured body part in both periods (1996: 31%, n = 38; 2013: 33%, n = 36), although upper limb injuries were predominant in snowboarders.CONCLUSION: Snow sports injury characteristics of patients presenting to a ski resort medical clinic have changed between 1996 and 2013. These findings can be used to further inform safety recommendations and areas to target with further research.

KW - skiing injuries

KW - snowboarding injuries

KW - snow sports

U2 - 10.1177/2325967115588280

DO - 10.1177/2325967115588280

M3 - Article

VL - 3

JO - Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine

JF - Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine

SN - 2325-9671

IS - 6

M1 - 2325967115588280

ER -