Characterisitics of fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder

Adelene Rasalam, H. Hailey, Justin Hereward Gwilym Williams, S. J. Moore, P. D. Turnpenny, David J Lloyd, John C S Dean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

248 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and frequency of autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome (AS; according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition [DSM-IV] criteria) in children exposed to anticonvulsant medication in utero. During a 20-year study period, 626 children were born in Aberdeen to mothers taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The study examined long-term effects of prenatal exposure to AEDs in 260 children (122 males, 138 females). Of these, 26 (16 males) were reported by parents to have social or behavioural difficulties. Eleven children (6 males, 5 females) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder and one (female) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for AS. These children comprised 4.6% of the exposed children studied, and 1.9% of all exposed children born during the study period. Mean age of these children at diagnosis was 5 years 4 months (SD 2y 11mo) and 9 years 10 months (SD 3y 10mo) at the time of this study. Other children from the group of 26 had difficulties in areas of speech and language development and social communication but did not meet the criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sodium valproate was the drug most commonly associated with autistic disorder, five of 56 (8.9%) of the study children exposed to sodium valproate alone had either autistic disorder or AS. It was concluded that prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant medication is a risk factor for the development of an ASD. Fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder is characterized by an even sex ratio, absence of regression or skill loss, and language delay in the absence of global delay.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-555
Number of pages4
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • VALPROATE SYNDROME
  • ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS
  • CONGENITAL-MALFORMATIONS
  • ADDITIONAL EVIDENCE
  • CHILDREN
  • EPILEPSY
  • MOTHERS
  • RISK
  • ACID

Cite this

Characterisitics of fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder. / Rasalam, Adelene; Hailey, H.; Williams, Justin Hereward Gwilym; Moore, S. J.; Turnpenny, P. D.; Lloyd, David J; Dean, John C S.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 47, 2005, p. 551-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rasalam, Adelene ; Hailey, H. ; Williams, Justin Hereward Gwilym ; Moore, S. J. ; Turnpenny, P. D. ; Lloyd, David J ; Dean, John C S. / Characterisitics of fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder. In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. 2005 ; Vol. 47. pp. 551-555.
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abstract = "The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and frequency of autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome (AS; according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition [DSM-IV] criteria) in children exposed to anticonvulsant medication in utero. During a 20-year study period, 626 children were born in Aberdeen to mothers taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The study examined long-term effects of prenatal exposure to AEDs in 260 children (122 males, 138 females). Of these, 26 (16 males) were reported by parents to have social or behavioural difficulties. Eleven children (6 males, 5 females) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder and one (female) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for AS. These children comprised 4.6{\%} of the exposed children studied, and 1.9{\%} of all exposed children born during the study period. Mean age of these children at diagnosis was 5 years 4 months (SD 2y 11mo) and 9 years 10 months (SD 3y 10mo) at the time of this study. Other children from the group of 26 had difficulties in areas of speech and language development and social communication but did not meet the criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sodium valproate was the drug most commonly associated with autistic disorder, five of 56 (8.9{\%}) of the study children exposed to sodium valproate alone had either autistic disorder or AS. It was concluded that prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant medication is a risk factor for the development of an ASD. Fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder is characterized by an even sex ratio, absence of regression or skill loss, and language delay in the absence of global delay.",
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T1 - Characterisitics of fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder

AU - Rasalam, Adelene

AU - Hailey, H.

AU - Williams, Justin Hereward Gwilym

AU - Moore, S. J.

AU - Turnpenny, P. D.

AU - Lloyd, David J

AU - Dean, John C S

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N2 - The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and frequency of autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome (AS; according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition [DSM-IV] criteria) in children exposed to anticonvulsant medication in utero. During a 20-year study period, 626 children were born in Aberdeen to mothers taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The study examined long-term effects of prenatal exposure to AEDs in 260 children (122 males, 138 females). Of these, 26 (16 males) were reported by parents to have social or behavioural difficulties. Eleven children (6 males, 5 females) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder and one (female) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for AS. These children comprised 4.6% of the exposed children studied, and 1.9% of all exposed children born during the study period. Mean age of these children at diagnosis was 5 years 4 months (SD 2y 11mo) and 9 years 10 months (SD 3y 10mo) at the time of this study. Other children from the group of 26 had difficulties in areas of speech and language development and social communication but did not meet the criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sodium valproate was the drug most commonly associated with autistic disorder, five of 56 (8.9%) of the study children exposed to sodium valproate alone had either autistic disorder or AS. It was concluded that prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant medication is a risk factor for the development of an ASD. Fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder is characterized by an even sex ratio, absence of regression or skill loss, and language delay in the absence of global delay.

AB - The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and frequency of autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome (AS; according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition [DSM-IV] criteria) in children exposed to anticonvulsant medication in utero. During a 20-year study period, 626 children were born in Aberdeen to mothers taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The study examined long-term effects of prenatal exposure to AEDs in 260 children (122 males, 138 females). Of these, 26 (16 males) were reported by parents to have social or behavioural difficulties. Eleven children (6 males, 5 females) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder and one (female) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for AS. These children comprised 4.6% of the exposed children studied, and 1.9% of all exposed children born during the study period. Mean age of these children at diagnosis was 5 years 4 months (SD 2y 11mo) and 9 years 10 months (SD 3y 10mo) at the time of this study. Other children from the group of 26 had difficulties in areas of speech and language development and social communication but did not meet the criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sodium valproate was the drug most commonly associated with autistic disorder, five of 56 (8.9%) of the study children exposed to sodium valproate alone had either autistic disorder or AS. It was concluded that prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant medication is a risk factor for the development of an ASD. Fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder is characterized by an even sex ratio, absence of regression or skill loss, and language delay in the absence of global delay.

KW - VALPROATE SYNDROME

KW - ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS

KW - CONGENITAL-MALFORMATIONS

KW - ADDITIONAL EVIDENCE

KW - CHILDREN

KW - EPILEPSY

KW - MOTHERS

KW - RISK

KW - ACID

U2 - 10.1017/S0012162205001076

DO - 10.1017/S0012162205001076

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 551

EP - 555

JO - Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

JF - Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

SN - 0012-1622

ER -