Childhood socioeconomic status and adult brain size

Childhood socioeconomic status influences adult hippocampal size

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:
To investigate in older adults without dementia the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived brain volume measures typical of brain aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Methods:
Using a cross-sectional and longitudinal observation approach, we invited volunteers without dementia, all born in 1936, and who were participants in the 1947 Scottish Mental Survey, for MR brain imaging; 249 of 320 (77%) agreed. We measured whole brain and hippocampal volumes and recorded childhood SES history, the number of years of education undertaken, and adult SES history. Mental ability at age 11 years was recorded in 1947 and was also available.
Results:
Analysis shows a significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volume after adjusting for mental ability at age 11 years, adult SES, gender, and education.
Interpretation:
A significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volumes in late life is consistent with the established neurodevelopmental findings that early life conditions have an effect on structural brain development. This remains detectable more than 50 years later.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)653-660
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume71
Issue number5
Early online date20 Apr 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Social Class
Brain
Aptitude
Dementia
Education
Brain Diseases
Neuroimaging
Volunteers
Alzheimer Disease
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Observation

Cite this

@article{6161ebe7545a4a6e97391f331addb219,
title = "Childhood socioeconomic status and adult brain size: Childhood socioeconomic status influences adult hippocampal size",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate in older adults without dementia the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived brain volume measures typical of brain aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Using a cross-sectional and longitudinal observation approach, we invited volunteers without dementia, all born in 1936, and who were participants in the 1947 Scottish Mental Survey, for MR brain imaging; 249 of 320 (77{\%}) agreed. We measured whole brain and hippocampal volumes and recorded childhood SES history, the number of years of education undertaken, and adult SES history. Mental ability at age 11 years was recorded in 1947 and was also available. Results: Analysis shows a significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volume after adjusting for mental ability at age 11 years, adult SES, gender, and education. Interpretation: A significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volumes in late life is consistent with the established neurodevelopmental findings that early life conditions have an effect on structural brain development. This remains detectable more than 50 years later.",
author = "Staff, {Roger T.} and Murray, {Alison D.} and Ahearn, {Trevor S.} and Nazahah Mustafa and Fox, {Helen C.} and Whalley, {Lawrence J.}",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1002/ana.22631",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "653--660",
journal = "Annals of Neurology",
issn = "0364-5134",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Childhood socioeconomic status and adult brain size

T2 - Childhood socioeconomic status influences adult hippocampal size

AU - Staff, Roger T.

AU - Murray, Alison D.

AU - Ahearn, Trevor S.

AU - Mustafa, Nazahah

AU - Fox, Helen C.

AU - Whalley, Lawrence J.

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - Objective: To investigate in older adults without dementia the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived brain volume measures typical of brain aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Using a cross-sectional and longitudinal observation approach, we invited volunteers without dementia, all born in 1936, and who were participants in the 1947 Scottish Mental Survey, for MR brain imaging; 249 of 320 (77%) agreed. We measured whole brain and hippocampal volumes and recorded childhood SES history, the number of years of education undertaken, and adult SES history. Mental ability at age 11 years was recorded in 1947 and was also available. Results: Analysis shows a significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volume after adjusting for mental ability at age 11 years, adult SES, gender, and education. Interpretation: A significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volumes in late life is consistent with the established neurodevelopmental findings that early life conditions have an effect on structural brain development. This remains detectable more than 50 years later.

AB - Objective: To investigate in older adults without dementia the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived brain volume measures typical of brain aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Using a cross-sectional and longitudinal observation approach, we invited volunteers without dementia, all born in 1936, and who were participants in the 1947 Scottish Mental Survey, for MR brain imaging; 249 of 320 (77%) agreed. We measured whole brain and hippocampal volumes and recorded childhood SES history, the number of years of education undertaken, and adult SES history. Mental ability at age 11 years was recorded in 1947 and was also available. Results: Analysis shows a significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volume after adjusting for mental ability at age 11 years, adult SES, gender, and education. Interpretation: A significant association between childhood SES and hippocampal volumes in late life is consistent with the established neurodevelopmental findings that early life conditions have an effect on structural brain development. This remains detectable more than 50 years later.

U2 - 10.1002/ana.22631

DO - 10.1002/ana.22631

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 653

EP - 660

JO - Annals of Neurology

JF - Annals of Neurology

SN - 0364-5134

IS - 5

ER -