Children's recognition of caricatures

P. P. Chang, Philip John Benson, S. C. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined children's and adults' perception and recognition of facial stimuli that were either systematically exaggerated (caricatures) or de-exaggerated (anticaricatures) relative to a norm face. The results showed that all age groups perceived caricatured as the most distinctive versions of a face and anticaricatures as the least distinctive, although the effect was smallest for 6-year-olds. In general, caricatures were identified as quickly as the veridical faces and faster than the anticaricatures. Across all age groups, participants' familiarity with the stimulus faces interacted with degree of caricature to determine speed of processing as well as choice of best likeness. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that distinctiveness information in a face is represented in relation to a norm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1038-1051
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • FACIAL ATTRACTIVENESS
  • DISTINCTIVE FACES
  • UNFAMILIAR FACES
  • SPATIAL LOCATION
  • EXEMPLAR MODEL
  • MEMORY
  • RACE
  • REPRESENTATIONS
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • EXAGGERATION

Cite this

Chang, P. P., Benson, P. J., & Levine, S. C. (2002). Children's recognition of caricatures. Developmental Psychology, 38(6), 1038-1051. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.38.6.1038