Clinical effectiveness of attentional bias modification training in abstinent alcoholic patients

Tim M Schoenmakers, Marijn de Bruin, Irja F M Lux, Alexa G Goertz, Dorieke H A T Van Kerkhof, Reinout W Wiers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

228 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new training to decrease attentional bias (attentional bias modification training, ABM) was tested in a randomized controlled experimental study with alcohol-dependent patients as an addition to cognitive behavioral therapy. In alcohol dependence, attentional bias has been associated with severity of alcoholism, craving, treatment outcome, and relapse. Forty-three patients with DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol dependence were randomly assigned to an ABM intervention or control training. The procedure consisted of five sessions in which patients were trained to disengage attention from alcohol-related stimuli (ABM condition) or in which they were trained on an irrelevant reaction-time test (control condition). We measured the effects of ABM on the visual-probe task, with stimuli that were presented in the ABM and with new stimuli. Craving was measured with the Desires for Alcohol Questionnaire. Follow-up data were gathered for overall treatment success, and relapse up to 3 months after the intervention. ABM was effective in increasing the ability to disengage from alcohol-related cues. This effect generalized to untrained, new stimuli. There were no significant effects on subjective craving. For other outcome measures there were indications of clinically relevant effects. Results indicate that ABM among alcohol-dependent patients was effective and that it may affect treatment progression. Large-scale trials are warranted to further investigate this new field.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-36
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume109
Issue number1-3
Early online date12 Jan 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2010

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Alcoholics
Alcohols
Alcoholism
Attentional Bias
Recurrence
Aptitude
Cognitive Therapy
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Reaction Time
Cues
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • adult
  • alcoholism
  • attention
  • behavior therapy
  • cues
  • education
  • female
  • humans
  • male
  • middle aged
  • patient dropouts
  • reaction time
  • recurrence
  • smoking
  • temperance
  • treatment outcome
  • attentional bias
  • attentional bias modification training
  • alcohol dependence
  • craving
  • relapse
  • treatment success

Cite this

Clinical effectiveness of attentional bias modification training in abstinent alcoholic patients. / Schoenmakers, Tim M; de Bruin, Marijn; Lux, Irja F M; Goertz, Alexa G; Van Kerkhof, Dorieke H A T; Wiers, Reinout W.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 109, No. 1-3, 01.06.2010, p. 30-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schoenmakers, Tim M ; de Bruin, Marijn ; Lux, Irja F M ; Goertz, Alexa G ; Van Kerkhof, Dorieke H A T ; Wiers, Reinout W. / Clinical effectiveness of attentional bias modification training in abstinent alcoholic patients. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2010 ; Vol. 109, No. 1-3. pp. 30-36.
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