Closing the feedback loop? Iterative feedback between tutor and student in coursework assessments

Martin Barker* (Corresponding Author), Michelle Pinard

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluate the case for using feedback iteratively, to improve student engagement and learning. In this model, students were invited to respond to tutor feedback with students’ own responses. Among the three courses/modules (three tutors) studied, differences in feedback styles were evident from: (a) thematic analysis of tutor comments and, for one course, and (b) comments in a student focus group. Students were inconsistent in their evaluation of tutor feedback but, in a more detailed study of one of the courses, there was clear evidence for the benefits of iterative feedback. Lessons from the main study were then applied to a course that had not previously incorporated iterative feedback. Using this experience, we provide suggestions for applying iterative feedback in assessments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)899-915
Number of pages17
JournalAssessment and Evaluation in Higher Education
Volume39
Issue number8
Early online date8 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

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Keywords

  • assessment for learning
  • formative
  • student response
  • summative

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Closing the feedback loop? Iterative feedback between tutor and student in coursework assessments. / Barker, Martin (Corresponding Author); Pinard, Michelle.

In: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 39, No. 8, 01.2014, p. 899-915.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "We evaluate the case for using feedback iteratively, to improve student engagement and learning. In this model, students were invited to respond to tutor feedback with students’ own responses. Among the three courses/modules (three tutors) studied, differences in feedback styles were evident from: (a) thematic analysis of tutor comments and, for one course, and (b) comments in a student focus group. Students were inconsistent in their evaluation of tutor feedback but, in a more detailed study of one of the courses, there was clear evidence for the benefits of iterative feedback. Lessons from the main study were then applied to a course that had not previously incorporated iterative feedback. Using this experience, we provide suggestions for applying iterative feedback in assessments.",
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