Coast to coast

First evidence for translocational movements by Scottish bottlenose dolphins (UK)

Kevin P. Robinson, Barbara J. Cheney, Laura Mandleberg, Sonja M. Eisfeld, Marina Costa, Phil Johnston, Peter T. Stevick

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

The analysis of ranging patterns in cetaceans is crucial to our understanding of the ecology, dynamics, social structure and evolutionary trajectory of a population. Knowledge of individual patterns of space and habitat use may
be used to identify residency and territoriality, for example, but can also provide important insights on the spatial and temporal distribution of available resources (Damuth 1981; Stevick et al. 2002). In the Moray Firth in northeast Scotland, two decades of bottlenose dolphin studies have led us to believe this population is very much isolated in the north-western North Sea region, with no evidence of exchange between animals in adjacent-studied groups on the west coast of Scotland or Ireland being found to date (Wilson & Grellier 2002; PT Stevick pers. comm.; O’Brien et al. in submission). However, in a recent effort to exchange photo-identification data between organisations working with the species in Scottish waters, the very first evidence for translocational movements of animals between the Moray Firth and the Inner Hebrides of the west coast of Scotland has been established.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event23rd Annual Conference of the European Cetacean Society - Istanbul, Turkey
Duration: 2 Mar 20094 Mar 2009

Conference

Conference23rd Annual Conference of the European Cetacean Society
CountryTurkey
CityIstanbul
Period2/03/094/03/09

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dolphin
space use
territoriality
animal
coast
cetacean
social structure
habitat use
temporal distribution
trajectory
spatial distribution
ecology
resource
water
analysis
sea

Cite this

Robinson, K. P., Cheney, B. J., Mandleberg, L., Eisfeld, S. M., Costa, M., Johnston, P., & Stevick, P. T. (2009). Coast to coast: First evidence for translocational movements by Scottish bottlenose dolphins (UK). Poster session presented at 23rd Annual Conference of the European Cetacean Society, Istanbul, Turkey.

Coast to coast : First evidence for translocational movements by Scottish bottlenose dolphins (UK). / Robinson, Kevin P.; Cheney, Barbara J.; Mandleberg, Laura; Eisfeld, Sonja M.; Costa, Marina; Johnston, Phil; Stevick, Peter T.

2009. Poster session presented at 23rd Annual Conference of the European Cetacean Society, Istanbul, Turkey.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Robinson, KP, Cheney, BJ, Mandleberg, L, Eisfeld, SM, Costa, M, Johnston, P & Stevick, PT 2009, 'Coast to coast: First evidence for translocational movements by Scottish bottlenose dolphins (UK)' 23rd Annual Conference of the European Cetacean Society, Istanbul, Turkey, 2/03/09 - 4/03/09, .
Robinson KP, Cheney BJ, Mandleberg L, Eisfeld SM, Costa M, Johnston P et al. Coast to coast: First evidence for translocational movements by Scottish bottlenose dolphins (UK). 2009. Poster session presented at 23rd Annual Conference of the European Cetacean Society, Istanbul, Turkey.
Robinson, Kevin P. ; Cheney, Barbara J. ; Mandleberg, Laura ; Eisfeld, Sonja M. ; Costa, Marina ; Johnston, Phil ; Stevick, Peter T. / Coast to coast : First evidence for translocational movements by Scottish bottlenose dolphins (UK). Poster session presented at 23rd Annual Conference of the European Cetacean Society, Istanbul, Turkey.1 p.
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