Cohort profile for the STratifying Resilience and Depression Longitudinally (STRADL) study: A depression-focused investigation of Generation Scotland, using detailed clinical, cognitive, and neuroimaging assessments

Tina Habota*, Anca-Larisa Sandu, Gordon D. Waiter, Christopher J. McNeil, J. Douglas Steele, Jennifer A. Macfarlane, Heather C. Whalley, Ruth Valentine, Dawn Younie, Nichola Crouch, Emma L. Hawkins, Yoriko Hirose, Liana Romaniuk, Keith Milburn, Gordon Buchan, Tessa Coupar, Mairi Stirling, Jagpal Baljit, Beverly MacLennan, Lucasz PribaMatthew A. Harris, Jonathan D. Hafferty, Mark J. Adams, Archie I. Campbell, Donald J. MacIntyre, Alison Pattie, Lee Murphy, Rebecca M. Reynolds, Rebecca Elliot, Ian S. Penton-Voak, Marcus R. Munafò, Kathryn L. Evans, Jonathan R. Seckl, Joanna M. Wardlaw, Stephen M. Lawrie, Christopher S. Haley, David J. Porteous, Ian J. Deary, Alison D. Murray, Andrew M. McIntosh

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

STratifying Resilience and Depression Longitudinally (STRADL) is a population-based study built on the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) resource. The aim of STRADL is to subtype major depressive disorder (MDD) on the basis of its aetiology, using detailed clinical, cognitive, and brain imaging assessments. The GS:SFHS provides an important opportunity to study complex gene-environment interactions, incorporating linkage to existing datasets and inclusion of early-life variables for two longitudinal birth cohorts. Specifically, data collection in STRADL included: socio-economic and lifestyle variables; physical measures; questionnaire data that assesses resilience, early-life adversity, personality, psychological health, and lifetime history of mood disorder; laboratory samples; cognitive tests; and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Some of the questionnaire and cognitive data were first assessed at the
GS:SFHS baseline assessment between 2006-2011, thus providing longitudinal measures of depression and resilience. Similarly, routine NHS data and early-life variables are linked to STRADL data, further providing opportunities for longitudinal analysis. Recruitment has been completed and we consented and tested 1,188 participants.
Original languageEnglish
Article number185
Number of pages20
JournalWellcome open research
Volume4
Early online date25 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • cognition
  • depression
  • Generation Scotland
  • longitudinal
  • neuroimaging
  • psychological resilience

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