Colonic bacterial metabolites and human health

Wendy R. Russell, Lesley Hoyles, Harry J. Flint*, Marc Emmanuel Dumas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

153 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of the microbial-mammalian metabolic axis is becoming increasingly important for human health. Bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates (CHOs) and proteins produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and a range of other metabolites including those from aromatic amino acid (AAA) fermentation. SCFA influence host health as energy sources and via multiple signalling mechanisms. Bacterial transformation of fibre-related phytochemicals is associated with a reduced incidence of several chronic diseases. The 'gut-liver axis' is an emerging area of study. Microbial deconjugation of xenobiotics and release of aromatic moieties into the colon can have a wide range of physiological consequences. In addition, the role of the gut microbiota in choline deficiency in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance is receiving increased attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-254
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Microbiology
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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Volatile Fatty Acids
Fermentation
Bacterial Transformation
Choline Deficiency
Aromatic Amino Acids
Disease Resistance
Health
Phytochemicals
Xenobiotics
Insulin Resistance
Colon
Chronic Disease
Carbohydrates
Liver
Incidence
Proteins
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Colonic bacterial metabolites and human health. / Russell, Wendy R.; Hoyles, Lesley; Flint, Harry J.; Dumas, Marc Emmanuel.

In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2013, p. 246-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Russell, Wendy R. ; Hoyles, Lesley ; Flint, Harry J. ; Dumas, Marc Emmanuel. / Colonic bacterial metabolites and human health. In: Current Opinion in Microbiology. 2013 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 246-254.
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