Community-acquired pneumonia mortality

a potential link to antibiotic prescribing trends in general practice

David Brendan Price, D. Honeybourne, P. Little, R. T. Mayon-White, R. C. Read, Michael David Thomas, M. C. Wale, P. FitzGerald, A. R. Weston, Christopher Charles Winchester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Community prescribing of antibiotics has decreased substantially in the UK in recent years. We examine the association between pneumonia mortality and recent changes in community-based antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI).

Methods: Retrospective analysis of aggregated data for pneumonia mortality, influenza incidence, and antibiotic prescribing for LRTI in England and Wales during 12-week winter periods between 1993/94 and 1999/2000.

Results: Winter antibiotic prescribing for LRTI showed a 30.0% decline since 1995/96. Over the same period, there was a 50.6% increase in winter excess pneumonia mortality adjusted for influenza incidence. Negative binomial regression analysis showed that the incidence of influenza alone had a significant association with winter pneumonia mortality (P<0.001). The analysis also showed the reduction in antibiotic prescribing had a small but significant association with mortality (P<0.001), when simultaneously modelling for influenza incidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalRespiratory Medicine
Volume98
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004

Keywords

  • antibiotic prescribing
  • lower respiratory tract infection
  • community-acquired pneumonia mortality
  • retrospective analysis
  • England and Wales
  • influenza epidemics
  • primary-care
  • escherichia-coli
  • resistance
  • children
  • impact
  • rates

Cite this

Price, D. B., Honeybourne, D., Little, P., Mayon-White, R. T., Read, R. C., Thomas, M. D., ... Winchester, C. C. (2004). Community-acquired pneumonia mortality: a potential link to antibiotic prescribing trends in general practice. Respiratory Medicine, 98(1), 17-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2003.08.011

Community-acquired pneumonia mortality : a potential link to antibiotic prescribing trends in general practice. / Price, David Brendan; Honeybourne, D.; Little, P.; Mayon-White, R. T.; Read, R. C.; Thomas, Michael David; Wale, M. C.; FitzGerald, P.; Weston, A. R.; Winchester, Christopher Charles.

In: Respiratory Medicine, Vol. 98, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 17-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Price, DB, Honeybourne, D, Little, P, Mayon-White, RT, Read, RC, Thomas, MD, Wale, MC, FitzGerald, P, Weston, AR & Winchester, CC 2004, 'Community-acquired pneumonia mortality: a potential link to antibiotic prescribing trends in general practice', Respiratory Medicine, vol. 98, no. 1, pp. 17-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2003.08.011
Price, David Brendan ; Honeybourne, D. ; Little, P. ; Mayon-White, R. T. ; Read, R. C. ; Thomas, Michael David ; Wale, M. C. ; FitzGerald, P. ; Weston, A. R. ; Winchester, Christopher Charles. / Community-acquired pneumonia mortality : a potential link to antibiotic prescribing trends in general practice. In: Respiratory Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 98, No. 1. pp. 17-24.
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AU - Thomas, Michael David

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AB - Background: Community prescribing of antibiotics has decreased substantially in the UK in recent years. We examine the association between pneumonia mortality and recent changes in community-based antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI).Methods: Retrospective analysis of aggregated data for pneumonia mortality, influenza incidence, and antibiotic prescribing for LRTI in England and Wales during 12-week winter periods between 1993/94 and 1999/2000.Results: Winter antibiotic prescribing for LRTI showed a 30.0% decline since 1995/96. Over the same period, there was a 50.6% increase in winter excess pneumonia mortality adjusted for influenza incidence. Negative binomial regression analysis showed that the incidence of influenza alone had a significant association with winter pneumonia mortality (P<0.001). The analysis also showed the reduction in antibiotic prescribing had a small but significant association with mortality (P<0.001), when simultaneously modelling for influenza incidence.

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KW - children

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