Community-based fall assessment compared with hospital-based assessment in community-dwelling older people over 65 at high risk of falling: a randomized study

Sanjay Suman, Phyo K Myint, Allan Clark, Partha Das, Liam Ring, Nicola J B Trepte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The effectiveness of community-based fall assessment programs in older people is unclear. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of community-based fall assessment compared with hospital-based assessment.

METHODS: A randomized un-blind study was conducted in 369 older adults aged 65 years and over at high risk of falling. Participants were drawn from a larger cohort of community-dwelling older people. Eligible participants were identified by means of a simple five-item screening tool. A randomly chosen subset population of people at high risk of falling was then randomized into two arms, community-based and hospital-based fall assessments. The total number of falls in both groups was recorded by following up subjects' diaries and telephone interviews at 3, 6 and 12 months. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) for the rate of falls at 12 months between community- and hospital-based assessments were analysed as primary outcome, by intention-to-treat analysis.

RESULTS: A total of 349 participants completed the study. Attendance to community-based assessment was significantly higher compared with hospital-based assessment in this older population (p=0.012). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in total number of falls at the 12 month follow-up. According to Negative Binomial regression, the adjusted IRR of falls in the community based arm was not significantly different from the hospital-based one (IRR 0.95; 95% CI 0.58-1.45, p=0.83).

CONCLUSION: This study showed the increased risk of falling according to community-based fall assessment program with respect to a traditional hospital-based one in community-dwelling older adults at high risk of falling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-41
Number of pages7
JournalAging Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

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Independent Living
Community Hospital
Incidence
Intention to Treat Analysis
Population
Interviews

Keywords

  • accidental falls
  • aged
  • female
  • hospitals
  • humans
  • male
  • residence characteristics
  • risk

Cite this

Community-based fall assessment compared with hospital-based assessment in community-dwelling older people over 65 at high risk of falling : a randomized study. / Suman, Sanjay; Myint, Phyo K; Clark, Allan; Das, Partha; Ring, Liam; Trepte, Nicola J B.

In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 23, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 35-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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