Comparison of automated home-cage monitoring systems: Emphasis on feeding behaviour, activity and spatial learning following pharmacological interventions

Lianne Robinson, Gernot Riedel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Different automated systems have been developed to facilitate long-term and continuous assessment of behaviours including locomotor activity, feeding behaviour and circadian activity.

New method: This study assessed the effectiveness of three different observation systems as methods for determining strain and pharmacological induced differences in locomotor activity, feeding behaviour and spatial learning. The effect of the CB1 antagonist AM251 on feeding behaviour was determined in the PhenoMaster and PhenoTyper. Next, effects of cholinergic (scopolamine) and glutamatergic (Phenylcyclidine, PCP) receptor antagonism and dopaminergic agonism (apomorphine) on activity were assessed in the PhenoTyper and IntelliCage. Finally, the IntelliCage was utilised to determine differences in activity and spatial learning of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mouse strains following pharmacological intervention.

Results: AM251 induced a suppression of food intake, feeding behaviour and a reduction in body weight in both the PhenoTyper and PhenoMaster. Apomorphine reduced activity in both the PhenoTyper and IntelliCage. Whereas, decreased activity was evident with PCP in the PhenoTyper, but not IntelliCage and Scopolamine induced a trend towards elevated levels of activity in the IntelliCage but not PhenoTyper. Strain differences in activity and spatial learning were also evident, with increased corner visits and drug induced impairments only observed with C57BL/6 mice.

Comparison with existing method: The automated home cage observation systems determined similar drug and strain effects on behaviour to those observed using traditional methods.

Conclusions: All three observation systems reported drug-induced changes in behaviour however, they differ in their application of spatial learning tasks and utilisation of single versus group housed recordings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-25
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume234
Early online date17 Jun 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2014

Fingerprint

Feeding Behavior
Pharmacology
Scopolamine Hydrobromide
Apomorphine
Observation
Locomotion
Phencyclidine Receptors
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Inbred DBA Mouse
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Cholinergic Agents
Eating
Body Weight
Spatial Learning
AM 251

Keywords

  • Food intake
  • Home cage
  • Locomotor activity
  • Mice
  • Spatial learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Different automated systems have been developed to facilitate long-term and continuous assessment of behaviours including locomotor activity, feeding behaviour and circadian activity. New method: This study assessed the effectiveness of three different observation systems as methods for determining strain and pharmacological induced differences in locomotor activity, feeding behaviour and spatial learning. The effect of the CB1 antagonist AM251 on feeding behaviour was determined in the PhenoMaster and PhenoTyper. Next, effects of cholinergic (scopolamine) and glutamatergic (Phenylcyclidine, PCP) receptor antagonism and dopaminergic agonism (apomorphine) on activity were assessed in the PhenoTyper and IntelliCage. Finally, the IntelliCage was utilised to determine differences in activity and spatial learning of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mouse strains following pharmacological intervention.Results: AM251 induced a suppression of food intake, feeding behaviour and a reduction in body weight in both the PhenoTyper and PhenoMaster. Apomorphine reduced activity in both the PhenoTyper and IntelliCage. Whereas, decreased activity was evident with PCP in the PhenoTyper, but not IntelliCage and Scopolamine induced a trend towards elevated levels of activity in the IntelliCage but not PhenoTyper. Strain differences in activity and spatial learning were also evident, with increased corner visits and drug induced impairments only observed with C57BL/6 mice. Comparison with existing method: The automated home cage observation systems determined similar drug and strain effects on behaviour to those observed using traditional methods.Conclusions: All three observation systems reported drug-induced changes in behaviour however, they differ in their application of spatial learning tasks and utilisation of single versus group housed recordings.",
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N2 - Background: Different automated systems have been developed to facilitate long-term and continuous assessment of behaviours including locomotor activity, feeding behaviour and circadian activity. New method: This study assessed the effectiveness of three different observation systems as methods for determining strain and pharmacological induced differences in locomotor activity, feeding behaviour and spatial learning. The effect of the CB1 antagonist AM251 on feeding behaviour was determined in the PhenoMaster and PhenoTyper. Next, effects of cholinergic (scopolamine) and glutamatergic (Phenylcyclidine, PCP) receptor antagonism and dopaminergic agonism (apomorphine) on activity were assessed in the PhenoTyper and IntelliCage. Finally, the IntelliCage was utilised to determine differences in activity and spatial learning of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mouse strains following pharmacological intervention.Results: AM251 induced a suppression of food intake, feeding behaviour and a reduction in body weight in both the PhenoTyper and PhenoMaster. Apomorphine reduced activity in both the PhenoTyper and IntelliCage. Whereas, decreased activity was evident with PCP in the PhenoTyper, but not IntelliCage and Scopolamine induced a trend towards elevated levels of activity in the IntelliCage but not PhenoTyper. Strain differences in activity and spatial learning were also evident, with increased corner visits and drug induced impairments only observed with C57BL/6 mice. Comparison with existing method: The automated home cage observation systems determined similar drug and strain effects on behaviour to those observed using traditional methods.Conclusions: All three observation systems reported drug-induced changes in behaviour however, they differ in their application of spatial learning tasks and utilisation of single versus group housed recordings.

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