Conceptualising teacher education for inclusion: lessons for the professional learning of educators from transnational and cross-sector perspectives

Mhairi C Beaton* (Corresponding Author), Stephanie Thomson, Sarah Cornelius, Rachel Lofthouse, Quinta Kools, Susanne Huber

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite policy calling for enhanced inclusive practice within all schools and colleges, educators across Europe are facing increasing challenges when providing effective inclusive education for all students as a result of increased diversity within European society. This paper focuses on the development of our understanding of how to support educators’ professional learning around issues of diversity and inclusion. Specifically, it aims to explore what diversity looks like across countries, sectors and roles, what challenges and dilemmas are posed for educators, and how new approaches to professional learning can support the educators across all sectors. The exploratory study described in the paper emerged from work undertaken as part of an Erasmus+ Strategic Partnership project called PROMISE (Promoting Inclusion in Society through Inclusion:
Professional Dilemmas in Practice). Traditional approaches to professional learning to support teachers’ inclusive practice have tended to focus on discrete courses which address specific learning needs such as autism, literacy difficulties or behavioral issues. The paper presents findings from a transnational study which indicate that the professional dilemmas facing educators are complex and unpredictable and argues, therefore, that educators require professional learning that is collaborative, inter professional and acknowledges that the challenges they face are multifaceted.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSustainability
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 9 Feb 2021

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