Conclusion - Dogs in the North

Jan Peter Laurens Loovers, Robert Losey, Robert Patrick Wishart

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Dogs are omnipresent across the globe and in some settings are subjects of great affection and importance. Human–dog relations across the North, however, vary in remarkable ways, often being far more complex than the owner-pet connections that are so familiar to us today. Lines intersecting with dogs and people are emphasized here, but other things and beings are also always intertwined across the North – sleds, fish, reindeer, landscapes, and so on. Relations of intimacy with dogs in the North are perhaps easiest to make sense of, but they are by no means consistent, even over the lifetime of an individual animal. Harriet Ritvo could be credited with identifying and coining one such redirection, namely the animal turn. V. Gordon Childe follows a similar path to Lewis Henry Morgan's work on human stages of evolution. He argued that civilization of humankind unfolded with the domestication of animals and plants.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDogs in the North
Subtitle of host publicationStories of Cooperation and Co-Domestication
EditorsRobert Losey, Robert Wishart, Jan Peters Laurens Loovers
PublisherOxbow Books
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781315437736
ISBN (Print)9781138218406
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jun 2018

Publication series

NameArctic Worlds

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