Consulting the Nation: Public Engagement on the Constitution in Scotland and Wales

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

With nationalist parties entering office in Scotland and Wales for the first time in 2007, the issue of constitutional change became a key part of political debate. The Scottish Government and Welsh Assembly Government attempted to engage the public in discussions on the issue through their respective consultations, A National Conversation in Scotland and the All-Wales Convention. This paper considers the impact and success of both in two key areas: setting the political agenda and shaping public opinion. It argues that while in Wales the public were broadly sympathetic to the objectives of the All-Wales Convention, the issue failed to command much interest, while in Scotland the opposite was true: the constitutional debate dominated the political agenda, yet the public remained unconvinced by the Scottish Government's objective.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages19
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventPolitical Studies Association (2013) - Cardiff, United Kingdom
Duration: 25 Mar 201327 Mar 2013

Conference

ConferencePolitical Studies Association (2013)
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityCardiff
Period25/03/1327/03/13

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management counsulting
constitution
political agenda
public opinion
conversation

Cite this

Harvey, M. (2013). Consulting the Nation: Public Engagement on the Constitution in Scotland and Wales. Paper presented at Political Studies Association (2013), Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Consulting the Nation : Public Engagement on the Constitution in Scotland and Wales. / Harvey, Malcolm.

2013. Paper presented at Political Studies Association (2013), Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Harvey, M 2013, 'Consulting the Nation: Public Engagement on the Constitution in Scotland and Wales', Paper presented at Political Studies Association (2013), Cardiff, United Kingdom, 25/03/13 - 27/03/13.
Harvey M. Consulting the Nation: Public Engagement on the Constitution in Scotland and Wales. 2013. Paper presented at Political Studies Association (2013), Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Harvey, Malcolm. / Consulting the Nation : Public Engagement on the Constitution in Scotland and Wales. Paper presented at Political Studies Association (2013), Cardiff, United Kingdom.19 p.
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