Contesting European Regions

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Abstract

Contesting European regions. Regional Studies. A regional or ‘meso’-level of regulation and policy-making has emerged in Europe. This cannot adequately be explained by functional imperatives or drivers. A constructivist perspective sees the region as the outcome of political contestation over the definition and meaning of territory. Six competing conceptual frames for regionalism are proposed: integrative; competitive; welfare; identity; government; and the region as a refraction of social and economic interests. Any given case will reflect a balance among these conceptions. Such an understanding permits a combination of comparative analysis with an understanding of individual cases and avoids both dismissal of territory and territorial determinism.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-18
Number of pages10
JournalRegional Studies
Volume51
Issue number1
Early online date11 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017

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meso level
regionalism
dismissal
determinism
policy making
refraction
welfare
driver
geography
regulation
economics
Europe
analysis

Keywords

  • regions
  • rescaling
  • regionalism

Cite this

Contesting European Regions. / Keating, Michael.

In: Regional Studies, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 9-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keating, Michael. / Contesting European Regions. In: Regional Studies. 2017 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 9-18.
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