Convection enhanced delivery of liposome encapsulated doxorubicin for brain tumour therapy

Wenbo Zhan, Chi-Hwa Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Convection enhanced delivery is promising to overcome the blood brain barrier. However, the treatment is less efficient in clinic due to the rapid elimination of small molecular drugs in brain tumours. In this study, numerical simulation is applied to investigate the convection enhanced delivery of liposome encapsulated doxorubicin under various conditions, based on a 3-D brain tumour model that is reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. Treatment efficacy is evaluated in terms of the tumour volume where the free doxorubicin concentration is above LD90. Simulation results denote that intracerebral infusion is effective in increasing the interstitial fluid velocity and inhibiting the fluid leakage from blood around the infusion site. Comparisons with direct doxorubicin infusion demonstrate the advantages of liposomes in enhancing the doxorubicin accumulation and penetration in the brain tumour. Delivery outcomes are determined by both the intratumoural environment and properties of therapeutic agents. The treatment efficacy can be improved by either increasing the liposome solution concentration and infusion rate, administrating liposomes in the tumour with normalised microvasculature density, or using liposomes with low vascular permeability. The delivery is less sensitive to liposome diffusivity in the examined range (E-11~E-7 cm2/s) as convective transport is dominative in determining the liposome migration. Drug release rate is able to be optimised by keeping a trade-off between enhancing the drug penetration and providing sufficient free doxorubicin for effective cell killing. Results from this study can be used to improve the regimen of CED treatments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)212-229
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Controlled Release
Volume285
Early online date17 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Convection
Brain Neoplasms
Liposomes
Doxorubicin
Therapeutics
Extracellular Fluid
Capillary Permeability
Microvessels
Tumor Burden
Blood-Brain Barrier
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Brain tumour
  • Convection enhanced delivery
  • Drug transport
  • Mathematical model
  • Liposome

Cite this

Convection enhanced delivery of liposome encapsulated doxorubicin for brain tumour therapy. / Zhan, Wenbo; Wang, Chi-Hwa.

In: Journal of Controlled Release, Vol. 285, 10.09.2018, p. 212-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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