CO2/CH4 Competitive Adsorption in Shale 

Implications for Enhancement in Gas Production and Reduction in Carbon Emissions

Jun Liu*, Lingzhi Xie, Derek Elsworth, Quan Gan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

CO2/CH4 interaction determines the prospects for complementary enhanced gas recovery (EGR) associated with CO2 sequestration in shale. We characterize the competitive adsorption of CO2 and CH4 in shale using low-field NMR. Competitive sorption of CO2 relative to CH4 is defined as the CO2/CH4 competitive adsorption ratio (CO2/CH4 CAR for short) when CO2 and CH4 have the same original partial pressure in shale. Results indicate the CO2/CH4 CAR decreases with the logarithm of increasing pressure. Observed CO2/CH4 CARs are on the order of 4.28-5.81 (YDN-1) to 3.43-5.57 (YDN-2), describing the remarkable competitive advantage of CO2 sorption relative to CH4 for shale. Results also indicate that increasing the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio (1) increases the adsorption capacity of shales to CO2 and decreases that to CH4 logarithmically with pressure, and (2) boosts CO2-CH4 displacement and generates greater EGR efficiency in shale, where the EGR efficiency can be inferred by the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio using a Langmuir-like function. Furthermore, the maximum sequestration capacity of adsorbed CO2 during CO2-CH4 competition is on the order of ∼3.87 cm3/g (YDN-1) to ∼5.13 cm3/g (YDN-2). These promising results for EGR and CO2 storage reveal the considerable potential for carbon capture and geological sequestration in shale.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9328-9336
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume53
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

carbon emission
Shale
gas production
shale
Carbon
Gases
adsorption
Adsorption
Recovery
gas
Sorption
sorption
Carbon capture
partial pressure
Partial pressure
carbon sequestration
nuclear magnetic resonance
Nuclear magnetic resonance
carbon

Keywords

  • MOLECULAR SIMULATION
  • CO2 SEQUESTRATION
  • MAGNETIC-RESONANCE
  • SICHUAN BASIN
  • METHANE
  • DIOXIDE
  • RESERVOIRS
  • INJECTION
  • CAPACITY
  • RECOVERY

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

CO2/CH4 Competitive Adsorption in Shale  : Implications for Enhancement in Gas Production and Reduction in Carbon Emissions. / Liu, Jun; Xie, Lingzhi; Elsworth, Derek; Gan, Quan.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 53, 18.07.2019, p. 9328-9336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cacf9b868b24405a8534afe080ddf55a,
title = "CO2/CH4 Competitive Adsorption in Shale : Implications for Enhancement in Gas Production and Reduction in Carbon Emissions",
abstract = "CO2/CH4 interaction determines the prospects for complementary enhanced gas recovery (EGR) associated with CO2 sequestration in shale. We characterize the competitive adsorption of CO2 and CH4 in shale using low-field NMR. Competitive sorption of CO2 relative to CH4 is defined as the CO2/CH4 competitive adsorption ratio (CO2/CH4 CAR for short) when CO2 and CH4 have the same original partial pressure in shale. Results indicate the CO2/CH4 CAR decreases with the logarithm of increasing pressure. Observed CO2/CH4 CARs are on the order of 4.28-5.81 (YDN-1) to 3.43-5.57 (YDN-2), describing the remarkable competitive advantage of CO2 sorption relative to CH4 for shale. Results also indicate that increasing the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio (1) increases the adsorption capacity of shales to CO2 and decreases that to CH4 logarithmically with pressure, and (2) boosts CO2-CH4 displacement and generates greater EGR efficiency in shale, where the EGR efficiency can be inferred by the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio using a Langmuir-like function. Furthermore, the maximum sequestration capacity of adsorbed CO2 during CO2-CH4 competition is on the order of ∼3.87 cm3/g (YDN-1) to ∼5.13 cm3/g (YDN-2). These promising results for EGR and CO2 storage reveal the considerable potential for carbon capture and geological sequestration in shale.",
keywords = "MOLECULAR SIMULATION, CO2 SEQUESTRATION, MAGNETIC-RESONANCE, SICHUAN BASIN, METHANE, DIOXIDE, RESERVOIRS, INJECTION, CAPACITY, RECOVERY",
author = "Jun Liu and Lingzhi Xie and Derek Elsworth and Quan Gan",
note = "We acknowledge financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11872258) and the Science & Technology Department of Sichuan Province (19GJHZ0146).",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1021/acs.est.9b02432",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "9328--9336",
journal = "Environmental Science & Technology",
issn = "0013-936X",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - CO2/CH4 Competitive Adsorption in Shale 

T2 - Implications for Enhancement in Gas Production and Reduction in Carbon Emissions

AU - Liu, Jun

AU - Xie, Lingzhi

AU - Elsworth, Derek

AU - Gan, Quan

N1 - We acknowledge financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11872258) and the Science & Technology Department of Sichuan Province (19GJHZ0146).

PY - 2019/7/18

Y1 - 2019/7/18

N2 - CO2/CH4 interaction determines the prospects for complementary enhanced gas recovery (EGR) associated with CO2 sequestration in shale. We characterize the competitive adsorption of CO2 and CH4 in shale using low-field NMR. Competitive sorption of CO2 relative to CH4 is defined as the CO2/CH4 competitive adsorption ratio (CO2/CH4 CAR for short) when CO2 and CH4 have the same original partial pressure in shale. Results indicate the CO2/CH4 CAR decreases with the logarithm of increasing pressure. Observed CO2/CH4 CARs are on the order of 4.28-5.81 (YDN-1) to 3.43-5.57 (YDN-2), describing the remarkable competitive advantage of CO2 sorption relative to CH4 for shale. Results also indicate that increasing the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio (1) increases the adsorption capacity of shales to CO2 and decreases that to CH4 logarithmically with pressure, and (2) boosts CO2-CH4 displacement and generates greater EGR efficiency in shale, where the EGR efficiency can be inferred by the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio using a Langmuir-like function. Furthermore, the maximum sequestration capacity of adsorbed CO2 during CO2-CH4 competition is on the order of ∼3.87 cm3/g (YDN-1) to ∼5.13 cm3/g (YDN-2). These promising results for EGR and CO2 storage reveal the considerable potential for carbon capture and geological sequestration in shale.

AB - CO2/CH4 interaction determines the prospects for complementary enhanced gas recovery (EGR) associated with CO2 sequestration in shale. We characterize the competitive adsorption of CO2 and CH4 in shale using low-field NMR. Competitive sorption of CO2 relative to CH4 is defined as the CO2/CH4 competitive adsorption ratio (CO2/CH4 CAR for short) when CO2 and CH4 have the same original partial pressure in shale. Results indicate the CO2/CH4 CAR decreases with the logarithm of increasing pressure. Observed CO2/CH4 CARs are on the order of 4.28-5.81 (YDN-1) to 3.43-5.57 (YDN-2), describing the remarkable competitive advantage of CO2 sorption relative to CH4 for shale. Results also indicate that increasing the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio (1) increases the adsorption capacity of shales to CO2 and decreases that to CH4 logarithmically with pressure, and (2) boosts CO2-CH4 displacement and generates greater EGR efficiency in shale, where the EGR efficiency can be inferred by the CO2/CH4 pressure ratio using a Langmuir-like function. Furthermore, the maximum sequestration capacity of adsorbed CO2 during CO2-CH4 competition is on the order of ∼3.87 cm3/g (YDN-1) to ∼5.13 cm3/g (YDN-2). These promising results for EGR and CO2 storage reveal the considerable potential for carbon capture and geological sequestration in shale.

KW - MOLECULAR SIMULATION

KW - CO2 SEQUESTRATION

KW - MAGNETIC-RESONANCE

KW - SICHUAN BASIN

KW - METHANE

KW - DIOXIDE

KW - RESERVOIRS

KW - INJECTION

KW - CAPACITY

KW - RECOVERY

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070598756&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/co-2-ch-4-competitive-adsorption-shale-implications-enhancement-gas-production-reduction-carbon-emis

U2 - 10.1021/acs.est.9b02432

DO - 10.1021/acs.est.9b02432

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 9328

EP - 9336

JO - Environmental Science & Technology

JF - Environmental Science & Technology

SN - 0013-936X

ER -