Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health

Jeffrey B Blumberg, Terri A Camesano, Aedin Cassidy, Penny Kris-Etherton, Amy Howell, Claudine Manach, Luisa M Ostertag, Helmut Sies, Ann Skulas-Ray, Joseph A Vita

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    115 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Recent observational and clinical studies have raised interest in the potential health effects of cranberry consumption, an association that appears to be due to the phytochemical content of this fruit. The profile of cranberry bioactives is distinct from that of other berry fruit, being rich in A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) in contrast to the B-type PACs present in most other fruit. Basic research has suggested a number of potential mechanisms of action of cranberry bioactives, although further molecular studies are necessary. Human studies on the health effects of cranberry products have focused principally on urinary tract and cardiovascular health, with some attention also directed to oral health and gastrointestinal epithelia. Evidence suggesting that cranberries may decrease the recurrence of urinary tract infections is important because a nutritional approach to this condition could lower the use of antibiotic treatment and the consequent development of resistance to these drugs. There is encouraging, but limited, evidence of a cardioprotective effect of cranberries mediated via actions on antioxidant capacity and lipoprotein profiles. The mixed outcomes from clinical studies with cranberry products could result from interventions testing a variety of products, often uncharacterized in their composition of bioactives, using different doses and regimens, as well as the absence of a biomarker for compliance to the protocol. Daily consumption of a variety of fruit is necessary to achieve a healthy dietary pattern, meet recommendations for micronutrient intake, and promote the intake of a diversity of phytochemicals. Berry fruit, including cranberries, represent a rich source of phenolic bioactives that may contribute to human health.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)618-632
    Number of pages15
    JournalAdvances in Nutrition
    Volume4
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

    Fingerprint

    Vaccinium macrocarpon
    cranberries
    human health
    Fruit
    Health
    Proanthocyanidins
    Phytochemicals
    proanthocyanidins
    phytopharmaceuticals
    fruits
    small fruits
    clinical trials
    urinary tract diseases
    Guideline Adherence
    cardioprotective effect
    variety trials
    Micronutrients
    urinary tract
    Oral Health
    observational studies

    Cite this

    Blumberg, J. B., Camesano, T. A., Cassidy, A., Kris-Etherton, P., Howell, A., Manach, C., ... Vita, J. A. (2013). Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health. Advances in Nutrition, 4(6), 618-632. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.113.004473

    Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health. / Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Camesano, Terri A; Cassidy, Aedin; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Howell, Amy; Manach, Claudine; Ostertag, Luisa M; Sies, Helmut; Skulas-Ray, Ann; Vita, Joseph A.

    In: Advances in Nutrition, Vol. 4, No. 6, 11.2013, p. 618-632.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Blumberg, JB, Camesano, TA, Cassidy, A, Kris-Etherton, P, Howell, A, Manach, C, Ostertag, LM, Sies, H, Skulas-Ray, A & Vita, JA 2013, 'Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health', Advances in Nutrition, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 618-632. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.113.004473
    Blumberg JB, Camesano TA, Cassidy A, Kris-Etherton P, Howell A, Manach C et al. Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health. Advances in Nutrition. 2013 Nov;4(6):618-632. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.113.004473
    Blumberg, Jeffrey B ; Camesano, Terri A ; Cassidy, Aedin ; Kris-Etherton, Penny ; Howell, Amy ; Manach, Claudine ; Ostertag, Luisa M ; Sies, Helmut ; Skulas-Ray, Ann ; Vita, Joseph A. / Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health. In: Advances in Nutrition. 2013 ; Vol. 4, No. 6. pp. 618-632.
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