Cultivating Small Business Influence in the UK: The Federation of Small Businesses' Journey from Outsider to Insider

Alexander Grant Jordan, Darren Halpin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This case study charts the classic transformation of a small business organisation from being a vehicle of protest that attracted a reasonable but transient membership into a much larger group with a more stable membership and a group with an effective insider policy style. The paper asserts that the change in style and the change in recruiting success are not causally linked, and, indeed, it claims that an insider style may harm recruiting. In the case of the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), however, any potential damage through adopting an insider style was more than offset by the separate decision to market the group door to door with a package of selective material incentives (Olson 1965). The paper describes the predominant insider politics style of political representation and finds that while the FSB has moved in that direction, it does not fully fit the stereotype. Copyright © 2003 Henry Stewart Publications
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-325
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Public Affairs
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Cultivating Small Business Influence in the UK : The Federation of Small Businesses' Journey from Outsider to Insider. / Jordan, Alexander Grant; Halpin, Darren.

In: Journal of Public Affairs, Vol. 3, No. 4, 2003, p. 313-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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