Cultures of Reciprocity and Cultures of Control in the Circumpolar North

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This article surveys different cultures of engagement between
people, animals, and the landscape across the circumpolar Arctic.
Through ethnographic examples the article describes offering rituals
and placings in several Arctic contexts in the light of the emphasis
they place on affirming personhood. Similarly, rituals of management
and regulation are described in the terms of how they strive to create
predictability and control. The article tries to mediate this contrast by
examining “architectural” examples of co-operation and co-domestication
between humans, animals and landscapes. The article concludes
with a reflection on how the themes of “origins” and “animal rights”
further reconstruct these dichotomies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-27
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Northern Studies
Volume8
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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reciprocity
animal
Arctic
religious behavior
regulation

Keywords

  • human-animal relationships
  • circumpolar
  • reciprocity
  • management
  • animal rights
  • domestication

Cite this

Cultures of Reciprocity and Cultures of Control in the Circumpolar North. / Anderson, David G.

In: Journal of Northern Studies, Vol. 8, No. 2, 2014, p. 11-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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