Death during the first 90 days of dialysis: a case control study

I H Khan, G R Catto, N Edward, A M MacLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Comparison of survival data among centers may be used to assess performance, but may be influenced by the number of patients who die during the first 90 days of renal replacement therapy (RRT). Data published by registries in Europe do not detail these deaths, and US data generally exclude them from analysis for financial reasons. To study factors influencing such deaths we compared 42 patients who died within 90 days of first commencing RRT in one Scottish renal unit (group A) between 1971 and 1992 with 42 age- and sex-matched controls who started RRT over the same period and survived longer (group B). Patients who died within 90 days of RRT ranged in age from 25.3 to 83.7 years and had a mean age of 65.2 (SEM, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 61.9 to 68.4). The proportion of patients who died during the first 90 days of RRT increased from 2% of all patients treated before 1981 to 12% in subsequent years. Thirty-three patients in group A received emergency dialysis via temporary venous access compared with only nine in group B (P <0.055). There were more patients in group A with a diagnosis of arteriosclerotic renal artery stenosis (14 v 1) and with a history of smoking (15 v 2) than in group B (P <0.0005). Median renal or nonrenal follow-up before RRT was 1.1 month in group A and 10.6 months in group B (P <0.0001). Fewer patients in group A had no coexisting disease (1 v 17; P <0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)276-80
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume25
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 1995

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Renal Replacement Therapy
Case-Control Studies
Dialysis
Kidney
Renal Artery Obstruction
Registries
Emergencies
Smoking
Confidence Intervals
Survival

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Cause of Death
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Kidney Failure, Chronic
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Renal Artery Obstruction
  • Renal Replacement Therapy
  • Serum Albumin
  • Smoking
  • Survival Rate

Cite this

Death during the first 90 days of dialysis: a case control study. / Khan, I H; Catto, G R; Edward, N; MacLeod, A M.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.02.1995, p. 276-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, I H ; Catto, G R ; Edward, N ; MacLeod, A M. / Death during the first 90 days of dialysis: a case control study. In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 1995 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 276-80.
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