Debriefing surgical trainees on non-technical skills (NOTSS)

S. Yule, R. Flin, N. Maran, G. Youngson, A. Mitchell, D. Rowley, S. Paterson-Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract Surgical trainees must maximise the educational and developmental opportunities of time spent in the operating theatre. Post-operative debriefing on performance based on observed skills is one way of achieving this and is regularly done in other high-risk professions. The non-technical skills for surgeons (NOTSS) behaviour rating system allows surgeons to observe trainees’ behaviour in the workplace and provide feedback for skill improvement in a structured manner. This paper describes the process of debriefing using NOTSS and presents the results of a usability trial. Two case studies also illustrate how the system was used. The majority of surgical trainers who participated reported that the NOTSS system provided a common language to discuss non-technical skills and was a valuable adjunct to currently available assessment tools. Some trainers found interpersonal skills more difficult to rate than cognitive skills but 73% (n = 8) felt that routine use of the system would enhance patient safety.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-274
Number of pages10
JournalCognition, Technology & Work
Volume10
Issue number4
Early online date24 Aug 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2008

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Keywords

  • surgical training
  • education
  • debriefing
  • non-technical skills
  • patient safety

Cite this

Debriefing surgical trainees on non-technical skills (NOTSS). / Yule, S.; Flin, R.; Maran, N.; Youngson, G.; Mitchell, A.; Rowley, D.; Paterson-Brown, S.

In: Cognition, Technology & Work, Vol. 10, No. 4, 10.2008, p. 265-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yule, S, Flin, R, Maran, N, Youngson, G, Mitchell, A, Rowley, D & Paterson-Brown, S 2008, 'Debriefing surgical trainees on non-technical skills (NOTSS)', Cognition, Technology & Work, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 265-274. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10111-007-0085-9
Yule, S. ; Flin, R. ; Maran, N. ; Youngson, G. ; Mitchell, A. ; Rowley, D. ; Paterson-Brown, S. / Debriefing surgical trainees on non-technical skills (NOTSS). In: Cognition, Technology & Work. 2008 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 265-274.
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