Debunking Spontaneity

Spain's 15-M/Indignados as Autonomous Movement

Cristina Flesher Fominaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Spanish 15-M/Indignados have drawn global attention for the strength and longevity of their anti-austerity mobilizations. Two features have been highlighted as particularly noteworthy: (1) Their refusal to allow institutional left actors to participate in or represent the movement, framed as a movement of ‘ordinary citizens’ and (2) their insistence on the use of deliberative democratic practices in large public assemblies as a central organizing principle. As with many emergent cycles of protest, many scholars, observers and participants attribute the mobilizations with spontaneity and ‘newness’. I argue that the ability of the 15-M/Indignados to sustain mobilization based on deliberative democratic practices is not spontaneous, but the result of the evolution of an autonomous collective identity predicated on deliberative movement culture in Spain since the early 1980s. My discussion contributes to the literature on social movement continuity and highlights the need for historically grounded analyses that pay close attention to the maintenance and evolution of collective identities and movement cultures in periods of latency or abeyance in order to better understand the rapid mobilization of networks in new episodes of contention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-163
Number of pages22
JournalSocial Movement Studies
Volume14
Issue number2
Early online date19 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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spontaneity
mobilization
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collective identity
social movement
protest
continuity
citizen
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Keywords

  • anti-austerity protests
  • global justice movement, Indignados/15-M, Spain, deliberative democracy, collective identity, autonomous movements, spontaneity, movement continuity, movement culture, genealogy
  • deliberative democracy
  • collective identity
  • genealogy
  • culture
  • autonomous movements
  • spontaneity
  • movement continuity
  • movement culture

Cite this

Debunking Spontaneity : Spain's 15-M/Indignados as Autonomous Movement. / Flesher Fominaya, Cristina.

In: Social Movement Studies, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2014, p. 142-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flesher Fominaya, Cristina. / Debunking Spontaneity : Spain's 15-M/Indignados as Autonomous Movement. In: Social Movement Studies. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 142-163.
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