Defining trait-based microbial strategies with consequences for soil carbon cycling under climate change

Ashish A. Malik* (Corresponding Author), Jennifer B.H. Martiny, Eoin L. Brodie, Adam C. Martiny, Kathleen K. Treseder, Steven D. Allison

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microorganisms are critical in terrestrial carbon cycling because their growth, activity and interactions with the environment largely control the fate of recent plant carbon inputs as well as protected soil organic carbon [1, 2]. Soil carbon stocks reflect a balance between microbial decomposition of organic carbon and stabilisation of microbial assimilated carbon. The balance can shift under altered environmental conditions [3], and new research suggests that knowledge of microbial physiology may be critical for projecting changes in soil carbon and improving the prognosis of climate change feedbacks [4,5,6,7]. Still, predicting the ecosystem implications of microbial processes remains a challenge. Here we argue that this challenge can be met by identifying microbial life history strategies based on an organism’s phenotypic characteristics, or traits, and representing these strategies in ecosystem models.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalThe ISME Journal
Volume14
Early online date25 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

Keywords

  • biogeochemistry
  • climate-change impacts
  • metabolism
  • microbial ecology
  • soil microbiology
  • PHYSIOLOGY
  • STRESS-RESPONSE
  • DECOMPOSITION
  • USE EFFICIENCY
  • CLASSIFICATION
  • COMMUNITIES
  • FEEDBACKS
  • TEMPERATURE
  • RELEVANCE
  • UNCERTAINTY

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