Degradation and toxicity of phenyltin compounds in soil.

Graeme Iain Paton, W. Cheewasedtham, Iain J Marr, Julian James Charles Dawson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the fate of organotins has been widely studied in the marine environment, fewer studies have considered their impact in terrestrial systems. The degradation and toxicity of triphenyltin in autoclaved, autoclaved-reinoculated and non-sterilised soil was studied in a 231 day incubation experiment following a single application. Degradation and toxicity of phenyltin compounds in soil was monitored using both chemical and microbial (lux-based bacterial biosensors) methods. Degradation was significantly slower in the sterile soil when compared to non-sterilised soils. In the non-sterilised treatment, the half-life of triphenyltin was 27 and 33 days at amendments of 10 and 20 mg Sn kg(-1), respectively. As initial triphenyltin degradation occurred, there was a commensurate increase in toxicity, reflecting the fact that metabolites produced may be both more bioavailable and toxic to the target receptor. Over time, the toxicity reduced as degradation proceeded. The toxicity impact on non-target receptors for these compounds may be significant. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)746-751
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume144
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • phenyltin
  • organotin
  • degradation
  • toxicity
  • biosensors
  • soils
  • ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS
  • ECOTOXICITY ASSESSMENT
  • TRIPHENYLTIN ACETATE
  • BIOSENSOR RESPONSES
  • CONTAMINATED SITES
  • FOREST SOILS
  • BACTERIAL
  • WATER
  • ACCUMULATION
  • POPULATIONS

Cite this

Degradation and toxicity of phenyltin compounds in soil. / Paton, Graeme Iain; Cheewasedtham, W.; Marr, Iain J; Dawson, Julian James Charles.

In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 144, 2006, p. 746-751.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paton, Graeme Iain ; Cheewasedtham, W. ; Marr, Iain J ; Dawson, Julian James Charles. / Degradation and toxicity of phenyltin compounds in soil. In: Environmental Pollution. 2006 ; Vol. 144. pp. 746-751.
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