Comparative use of the Ages and Stages Questionnaires in the USA and Scandinavia: a systematic review

Kevin P. Marks (Corresponding Author), Nina Madsen Sjö, Philip Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim
The aim of this systematic review was to investigate screening practices with the Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social‐Emotional (ASQ:SE) in the USA and Scandinavia and to identify practical lessons and research opportunities.

Method
The review was performed for ASQ‐ and ASQ:SE‐related studies in children from birth to 5 years. From nine databases and 1689 references (published from 1988–2018), 127 articles were included and categorized using Covidence online software. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Checklists were used before data synthesis.

Results
US studies primarily use the ASQ/ASQ:SE to detect delays in general and at‐risk populations in medical settings, which increases early detection, clinician‐referral, and intervention rates. Scandinavian studies commonly use the ASQ/ASQ:SE to monitor developmental–behavioural differences in intervention/exposure‐based cohorts. Pre‐visit screening yields completion/return rates of 83% to more than 90% and fosters same‐day interpretation. When referrals are indicated, systemwide care coordination or colocation with a developmental–behavioural specialist is beneficial.

Interpretation
Practical implementation lessons are reviewed. Research opportunities include investigating and measuring the ASQ/ASQ:SE's ‘overall’ sections. Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish translations are available but up‐to‐date norming and validation studies are needed throughout Scandinavia. Randomized controlled trials are needed to investigate outcomes in screened versus unscreened cohorts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-430
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume61
Issue number4
Early online date23 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Validation Studies
Checklist
Research
Referral and Consultation
Software
Randomized Controlled Trials
Parturition
Databases

Keywords

  • Ages & Stages Questionnaire
  • ASQ
  • Ages & Stages Questionnaire-Social Emotional
  • social-emotional screening
  • develpomental screening
  • behavioral screening
  • SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL PROBLEMS
  • EARLY INTERVENTION
  • PRETERM INFANTS
  • INFANT DEVELOPMENT-II
  • NEURODEVELOPMENTAL FOLLOW-UP
  • INFERTILITY TREATMENT
  • PRIMARY-CARE
  • EARLY SUPPLEMENTATION
  • COMPLETED DEVELOPMENTAL QUESTIONNAIRES
  • YOUNG-CHILDREN

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Comparative use of the Ages and Stages Questionnaires in the USA and Scandinavia : a systematic review. / Marks, Kevin P. (Corresponding Author); Sjö, Nina Madsen ; Wilson, Philip.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 61, No. 4, 04.2019, p. 419-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Comparative use of the Ages and Stages Questionnaires in the USA and Scandinavia

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AU - Marks, Kevin P.

AU - Sjö, Nina Madsen

AU - Wilson, Philip

N1 - No external funding was secured for this study. The authors have no financial relationships to disclose relevant to this article. The authors have stated that they had no interests which might be perceived as posing a conflict or bias.

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N2 - AimThe aim of this systematic review was to investigate screening practices with the Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social‐Emotional (ASQ:SE) in the USA and Scandinavia and to identify practical lessons and research opportunities.MethodThe review was performed for ASQ‐ and ASQ:SE‐related studies in children from birth to 5 years. From nine databases and 1689 references (published from 1988–2018), 127 articles were included and categorized using Covidence online software. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Checklists were used before data synthesis.ResultsUS studies primarily use the ASQ/ASQ:SE to detect delays in general and at‐risk populations in medical settings, which increases early detection, clinician‐referral, and intervention rates. Scandinavian studies commonly use the ASQ/ASQ:SE to monitor developmental–behavioural differences in intervention/exposure‐based cohorts. Pre‐visit screening yields completion/return rates of 83% to more than 90% and fosters same‐day interpretation. When referrals are indicated, systemwide care coordination or colocation with a developmental–behavioural specialist is beneficial.InterpretationPractical implementation lessons are reviewed. Research opportunities include investigating and measuring the ASQ/ASQ:SE's ‘overall’ sections. Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish translations are available but up‐to‐date norming and validation studies are needed throughout Scandinavia. Randomized controlled trials are needed to investigate outcomes in screened versus unscreened cohorts.

AB - AimThe aim of this systematic review was to investigate screening practices with the Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social‐Emotional (ASQ:SE) in the USA and Scandinavia and to identify practical lessons and research opportunities.MethodThe review was performed for ASQ‐ and ASQ:SE‐related studies in children from birth to 5 years. From nine databases and 1689 references (published from 1988–2018), 127 articles were included and categorized using Covidence online software. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Checklists were used before data synthesis.ResultsUS studies primarily use the ASQ/ASQ:SE to detect delays in general and at‐risk populations in medical settings, which increases early detection, clinician‐referral, and intervention rates. Scandinavian studies commonly use the ASQ/ASQ:SE to monitor developmental–behavioural differences in intervention/exposure‐based cohorts. Pre‐visit screening yields completion/return rates of 83% to more than 90% and fosters same‐day interpretation. When referrals are indicated, systemwide care coordination or colocation with a developmental–behavioural specialist is beneficial.InterpretationPractical implementation lessons are reviewed. Research opportunities include investigating and measuring the ASQ/ASQ:SE's ‘overall’ sections. Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish translations are available but up‐to‐date norming and validation studies are needed throughout Scandinavia. Randomized controlled trials are needed to investigate outcomes in screened versus unscreened cohorts.

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