Devolution and the territorial politics of foreign direct investment

Daniel F MacKinnon, N. A. Phelps

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    51 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this paper, we consider the possible effects of devolution on the territorial politics of foreign direct investment (FDI), focusing on two regions in particular: Wales and the North East of England. Informed by recent work on the politics of spatial scale, the paper draws attention to the role of regional actors in supporting processes of globalisation from below whilst also suggesting that regions are produced from above through processes of FDI-led globalisation and state rescaling. We explore the territorial politics of FDI in the UK through the central notion of an Inward Investment Service Class (IISC). This concept enables us to operationalise our ideas of 'bottom up' globalisation and 'top down' regionalisation by focusing attention on the role of a specific set of economic development interests within the two regions. The paper argues that while the notion of an IISC highlights important relationships within Wales and the North East, it is questionable whether the groups identified actually function as an identifiable coalition. In terms of how devolution might shape approaches to FDI in the context of pre-existing institutional differences between Scotland, Wales and the English regions, we suggest that the prospect of increased inter-regional competition for FDI may be balanced by inter-regional collaboration. In conclusion, the authors stress the need for further research to advance our understanding of how processes of globalisation from below actually operate. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd, All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)353-379
    Number of pages26
    JournalPolitical Geography
    Volume20
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2001

    Keywords

    • devolution
    • foreign direct investment
    • inward investment service class
    • scale
    • regions
    • globalisation
    • ECONOMIC-DEVELOPMENT
    • INWARD INVESTMENT
    • SCALE
    • ENGLAND
    • STATE
    • GOVERNANCE
    • URBAN
    • GLOBALIZATION
    • REGIONALISM
    • ORGANIZATION

    Cite this

    Devolution and the territorial politics of foreign direct investment. / MacKinnon, Daniel F; Phelps, N. A.

    In: Political Geography, Vol. 20, No. 3, 03.2001, p. 353-379.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    MacKinnon, Daniel F ; Phelps, N. A. / Devolution and the territorial politics of foreign direct investment. In: Political Geography. 2001 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 353-379.
    @article{d597a1c28df44baaa75e3e4c43767e57,
    title = "Devolution and the territorial politics of foreign direct investment",
    abstract = "In this paper, we consider the possible effects of devolution on the territorial politics of foreign direct investment (FDI), focusing on two regions in particular: Wales and the North East of England. Informed by recent work on the politics of spatial scale, the paper draws attention to the role of regional actors in supporting processes of globalisation from below whilst also suggesting that regions are produced from above through processes of FDI-led globalisation and state rescaling. We explore the territorial politics of FDI in the UK through the central notion of an Inward Investment Service Class (IISC). This concept enables us to operationalise our ideas of 'bottom up' globalisation and 'top down' regionalisation by focusing attention on the role of a specific set of economic development interests within the two regions. The paper argues that while the notion of an IISC highlights important relationships within Wales and the North East, it is questionable whether the groups identified actually function as an identifiable coalition. In terms of how devolution might shape approaches to FDI in the context of pre-existing institutional differences between Scotland, Wales and the English regions, we suggest that the prospect of increased inter-regional competition for FDI may be balanced by inter-regional collaboration. In conclusion, the authors stress the need for further research to advance our understanding of how processes of globalisation from below actually operate. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd, All rights reserved.",
    keywords = "devolution, foreign direct investment, inward investment service class, scale, regions, globalisation, ECONOMIC-DEVELOPMENT, INWARD INVESTMENT, SCALE, ENGLAND, STATE, GOVERNANCE, URBAN, GLOBALIZATION, REGIONALISM, ORGANIZATION",
    author = "MacKinnon, {Daniel F} and Phelps, {N. A.}",
    year = "2001",
    month = "3",
    doi = "10.1016/S0962-6298(00)00068-8",
    language = "English",
    volume = "20",
    pages = "353--379",
    journal = "Political Geography",
    issn = "0962-6298",
    publisher = "Elsevier BV",
    number = "3",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Devolution and the territorial politics of foreign direct investment

    AU - MacKinnon, Daniel F

    AU - Phelps, N. A.

    PY - 2001/3

    Y1 - 2001/3

    N2 - In this paper, we consider the possible effects of devolution on the territorial politics of foreign direct investment (FDI), focusing on two regions in particular: Wales and the North East of England. Informed by recent work on the politics of spatial scale, the paper draws attention to the role of regional actors in supporting processes of globalisation from below whilst also suggesting that regions are produced from above through processes of FDI-led globalisation and state rescaling. We explore the territorial politics of FDI in the UK through the central notion of an Inward Investment Service Class (IISC). This concept enables us to operationalise our ideas of 'bottom up' globalisation and 'top down' regionalisation by focusing attention on the role of a specific set of economic development interests within the two regions. The paper argues that while the notion of an IISC highlights important relationships within Wales and the North East, it is questionable whether the groups identified actually function as an identifiable coalition. In terms of how devolution might shape approaches to FDI in the context of pre-existing institutional differences between Scotland, Wales and the English regions, we suggest that the prospect of increased inter-regional competition for FDI may be balanced by inter-regional collaboration. In conclusion, the authors stress the need for further research to advance our understanding of how processes of globalisation from below actually operate. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd, All rights reserved.

    AB - In this paper, we consider the possible effects of devolution on the territorial politics of foreign direct investment (FDI), focusing on two regions in particular: Wales and the North East of England. Informed by recent work on the politics of spatial scale, the paper draws attention to the role of regional actors in supporting processes of globalisation from below whilst also suggesting that regions are produced from above through processes of FDI-led globalisation and state rescaling. We explore the territorial politics of FDI in the UK through the central notion of an Inward Investment Service Class (IISC). This concept enables us to operationalise our ideas of 'bottom up' globalisation and 'top down' regionalisation by focusing attention on the role of a specific set of economic development interests within the two regions. The paper argues that while the notion of an IISC highlights important relationships within Wales and the North East, it is questionable whether the groups identified actually function as an identifiable coalition. In terms of how devolution might shape approaches to FDI in the context of pre-existing institutional differences between Scotland, Wales and the English regions, we suggest that the prospect of increased inter-regional competition for FDI may be balanced by inter-regional collaboration. In conclusion, the authors stress the need for further research to advance our understanding of how processes of globalisation from below actually operate. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd, All rights reserved.

    KW - devolution

    KW - foreign direct investment

    KW - inward investment service class

    KW - scale

    KW - regions

    KW - globalisation

    KW - ECONOMIC-DEVELOPMENT

    KW - INWARD INVESTMENT

    KW - SCALE

    KW - ENGLAND

    KW - STATE

    KW - GOVERNANCE

    KW - URBAN

    KW - GLOBALIZATION

    KW - REGIONALISM

    KW - ORGANIZATION

    U2 - 10.1016/S0962-6298(00)00068-8

    DO - 10.1016/S0962-6298(00)00068-8

    M3 - Article

    VL - 20

    SP - 353

    EP - 379

    JO - Political Geography

    JF - Political Geography

    SN - 0962-6298

    IS - 3

    ER -