Diabetes causes an early reduction in autonomic ganglion blood flow in rats

Norman E Cameron, Mary Anne Cotter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Impaired blood flow to peripheral nerve trunks makes a major contribution to the neuropathic complications of diabetes mellitus. Comparatively little attention has been paid to perfusion abnormalities for the cell bodies of origin of the autonomic and sensory nerves, although they are severely affected in diabetic neuropathy. The aim was to examine the time course of changes in superior cervical ganglion (SCG) perfusion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Ganglion blood flow. measured by hydrogen clearance microelectrode polarography, was approximately 70 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1). One week of diabetes caused a 46% perfusion deficit, which was maintained (54%) over 24 weeks. Thus. an early, profound, and long-lived reduction in ganglion perfusion may deleteriously affect neural cell body function and could contribute to autonomic neuropathy. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-202
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Diabetes and its Complications
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • autonomic neuropathy
  • blood flow
  • superior cervical ganglion
  • sympathetic neuron
  • diabetic rat
  • ALPHA-LIPOIC ACID
  • NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE
  • CORPUS CAVERNOSUM
  • NERVE FUNCTION
  • NEUROPATHY
  • CONDUCTION
  • CARNITINE
  • INHIBITOR
  • RESPONSES
  • PATHWAY

Cite this

Diabetes causes an early reduction in autonomic ganglion blood flow in rats. / Cameron, Norman E; Cotter, Mary Anne.

In: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, Vol. 15, No. 4, 2001, p. 198-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cameron, Norman E ; Cotter, Mary Anne. / Diabetes causes an early reduction in autonomic ganglion blood flow in rats. In: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications. 2001 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 198-202.
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