Diaspora, defeatism, and dignity: Ulster Protestant reimaginations of the self through Ulster-Scots Americanism

Peter Robert Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The notion of an American diaspora has become increasingly salient among the minority of Ulster Protestants who ascribe to the “Ulster-Scots” ethnic identity in Northern Ireland. Especially in light of the well-established conception of an Irish-American diaspora, the effort Ulster’s “Protestant community” to construct and delineate a separate, non-Irish genealogical diaspora reveals much about their collective self-conceptions and aspirations. In this paper, I argue that the descriptions of Ulster-Scots-American diaspora represent both means of recasting “their” actions and ideologies as ethnically predestined, and an attempt to regain a sense of collective dignity in light of palpable postbellum defeatism.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-19
JournalEthnic and Racial Studies
Early online date1 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jun 2017

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diaspora
ethnic identity
Ideologies
minority
community

Keywords

  • ethnicity
  • Northern Ireland
  • unionism
  • loyalism
  • diaspora
  • dignity

Cite this

Diaspora, defeatism, and dignity : Ulster Protestant reimaginations of the self through Ulster-Scots Americanism. / Gardner, Peter Robert.

In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, 01.06.2017, p. 1-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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