Did Romanization impact Gallic pig morphology? New insights from molar geometric morphometrics

Colin Duval, Sebastien lepetz, Marie-Pierre Horard-Herbin, Thomas Cucchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

In Western Europe, at the turn of our era, the emergence of the Roman economic and agropastoral model is considered as the trigger for morphological changes experienced by livestock. This assumption is now undermined, reviving questions of the origin and mechanism of these changes as well as the influence of Gaul's agricultural particularities in the process. To investigate this question we used a geometric morphometric approach to study the phenotypic relationships of almost 600 dental remains of pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) from 11 Gallic and Italian sites, and pinpoint evidence of Roman or indigenous signature on the livestock. The comparison of these different samples allowed us to demonstrate that the link between the Roman and Gallic pigs is weak, and, more importantly, that each of the two territories seem to follow its own livestock management model. Furthermore, each region or settlement within
Gaul adopted their own particular pastoral or supplying strategies; apart from two urban sites of central Gaul which showed clear phenotypic relationships with southern populations. These results suggest that the pigs' morphology depended mainly on agricultural and economic characteristics of the different
territories, within Gaul and Italy, except perhaps on some urban sites with different supply strategies. It seems, therefore, that the changing economic environment impacted both provinces independently, or at least differently, since it cannot be excluded that there may have been some commercial relationships
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-354
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Archaeological Science
Volume57
Early online date11 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2015

Fingerprint

economics
Western Europe
Italy
supply
management
evidence
Economics
Livestock
Pig
Geometric Morphometrics
Gaul
Romanization
Trigger
Signature
Particularity
Sus Scrofa

Keywords

  • archaeozoology
  • Iron Age
  • Roman period
  • Gaul
  • Italy
  • Molar shape
  • morphological and phenotypic changes
  • local and regional diversity

Cite this

Did Romanization impact Gallic pig morphology? New insights from molar geometric morphometrics. / Duval, Colin ; lepetz, Sebastien; Horard-Herbin, Marie-Pierre; Cucchi, Thomas.

In: Journal of Archaeological Science, Vol. 57, 05.2015, p. 345-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duval, Colin ; lepetz, Sebastien ; Horard-Herbin, Marie-Pierre ; Cucchi, Thomas. / Did Romanization impact Gallic pig morphology? New insights from molar geometric morphometrics. In: Journal of Archaeological Science. 2015 ; Vol. 57. pp. 345-354.
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abstract = "In Western Europe, at the turn of our era, the emergence of the Roman economic and agropastoral model is considered as the trigger for morphological changes experienced by livestock. This assumption is now undermined, reviving questions of the origin and mechanism of these changes as well as the influence of Gaul's agricultural particularities in the process. To investigate this question we used a geometric morphometric approach to study the phenotypic relationships of almost 600 dental remains of pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) from 11 Gallic and Italian sites, and pinpoint evidence of Roman or indigenous signature on the livestock. The comparison of these different samples allowed us to demonstrate that the link between the Roman and Gallic pigs is weak, and, more importantly, that each of the two territories seem to follow its own livestock management model. Furthermore, each region or settlement withinGaul adopted their own particular pastoral or supplying strategies; apart from two urban sites of central Gaul which showed clear phenotypic relationships with southern populations. These results suggest that the pigs' morphology depended mainly on agricultural and economic characteristics of the differentterritories, within Gaul and Italy, except perhaps on some urban sites with different supply strategies. It seems, therefore, that the changing economic environment impacted both provinces independently, or at least differently, since it cannot be excluded that there may have been some commercial relationships",
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author = "Colin Duval and Sebastien lepetz and Marie-Pierre Horard-Herbin and Thomas Cucchi",
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AU - Duval, Colin

AU - lepetz, Sebastien

AU - Horard-Herbin, Marie-Pierre

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N1 - We are most grateful to Noël Mahéo (Amiens Métropole), Eric Binet (Amiens Métropole), Yoann Zotna (Conseil général de la Somme) and his team, Stéphane Gaudefoy (INRAP Nord Picardie), Olivier Buchsenschutz (CNRS), Isabelle Fauduet (CNRS), Philippe Brunet (SRA Région Centre), Christiane Sire (DRAC Centre), Vianney Forest (INRAP Méditerranée), Nuria Nin (Ville d'Aix-en-Provence), Armelle Gardeisen (CNRS) and the team of the Centre archéologique de Lattes, and finally Vincent Jolivet (CNRS) for allowing us access to the samples analysed in our study.

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N2 - In Western Europe, at the turn of our era, the emergence of the Roman economic and agropastoral model is considered as the trigger for morphological changes experienced by livestock. This assumption is now undermined, reviving questions of the origin and mechanism of these changes as well as the influence of Gaul's agricultural particularities in the process. To investigate this question we used a geometric morphometric approach to study the phenotypic relationships of almost 600 dental remains of pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) from 11 Gallic and Italian sites, and pinpoint evidence of Roman or indigenous signature on the livestock. The comparison of these different samples allowed us to demonstrate that the link between the Roman and Gallic pigs is weak, and, more importantly, that each of the two territories seem to follow its own livestock management model. Furthermore, each region or settlement withinGaul adopted their own particular pastoral or supplying strategies; apart from two urban sites of central Gaul which showed clear phenotypic relationships with southern populations. These results suggest that the pigs' morphology depended mainly on agricultural and economic characteristics of the differentterritories, within Gaul and Italy, except perhaps on some urban sites with different supply strategies. It seems, therefore, that the changing economic environment impacted both provinces independently, or at least differently, since it cannot be excluded that there may have been some commercial relationships

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